ReactorWeekend

Required Reading

by Hrag Vartanian on March 9, 2014

Every few months another publication seems to discover the hauntingly beautiful images by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky, who was a pioneer of color photography. Do yourself a favor and peruse this Flickr account with images, and this past week the Daily Mail also excavated some.

Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky, “The waterfall Kivach. Suna River, 1915″ (1915). Every few months another publication seems to discover the hauntingly beautiful images by Sergey Prokudin-Gorsky, who was a pioneer of color photography. Do yourself a favor and peruse this Flickr account with images, and this past week the Daily Mail also excavated some. (via the Prokudin-Gorksy Flickrstream)

This week, the state of artist studios, doxxing mania, startup slavery, Zwirner talks to Charlie Rose, fetishizing slums, where people read most, best graffiti of the week, and more.

 The New York Times has a big report on the state of artist studios in New York and how artists are coping with real estate traumas of today:

It’s been over six months since some four dozen artists lost their studios in Industry City, a sprawling factory complex on the Brooklyn waterfront. Many had spent decades hopping from studio to studio, from borough to borough. But according to interviews with over two dozen of the displaced, that practice of alighting in new, ungentrified neighborhoods has, at least for them, ground to something of a halt, hampered by a common refrain in New York: Rents are rising too fast.

 Everyone has been talking about doxxing this week, which means revealing the identity of someone who wants to remain anonymous in a public forum, usually with a malicious intent. The conversation started with Leah McGrath Goodman’s Newsweek article outing Japanese-American Satoshi Nakamoto as the inventor of bitcoin.

AlJazeera America outlined some of the criticism that “took issue with the level of personal details about Nakamoto in the piece.”

 Something else everyone is talking about is a new company, Upstart, which is trying to connect “bright, ambitious young people with wealthy individuals who want to invest in their futures.” If that doesn’t sound creepy and kind of like a form of slavery … well, read this:

What ultimately turned Becker off was his belief that American courts wouldn’t find contracts of indenture enforceable, and that dissatisfied servants could (theoretically) do a lousy job until they were released. The Chicago School economists were fans of coercing people to work through their need for food, not by contract. But as human capital trading normalizes, investors will be able to depend on people’s need to support themselves as well. There’s little doubt in my mind that America’s courts will back aggressive debt collection.

And OMG:

We will caution small children to think of their future price the same way we now tell them to think of college admissions. We will know exactly how much the markets think we’re worth, and which of our fellow human beings are worthless. We will create secondary markets. We will look at the upsides, the inspirational success stories, and we will rationalize the same ways people have always rationalized buying and selling each other. The ham-fisted sci-fi future of capitalism is clear because it’s already here; what’s not yet clear is the end.

Gallerist David Zwirner speaks to PBS television host Charlie Rose about his career and art:

 Guy Horton makes the argument for why architects should not fetishize slums:

Whenever I see sensational exposes on the supposedly sublime spatial intensity of Hong Kong’s Kowloon Walled City (demolished in 1994), they strike me as nothing more than colonial fantasies that have little to do with the reality of living in the midst of one of the world’s cruelest slums.

 Every wonder where people read the most? Well, it’s definitely not in the West:

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 The economic realities of the camera industry don’t look very good, including a 40% drop in cameras and a 20% drop in lenses:

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 Here are the maps of the undersea wires that form the structure of today’s internet:

underwater-cables-map

 Just in time for the 2014 Armory Show in New York City, music critic Sasha Frere-Jones reminds us of Richard Jobson’s “Armoury Show” from 1980 #classic:

 And this wins the best graffiti of the week award:

Screen Shot 2014-03-09 at 10.48.24 AM

Required Reading is published every Sunday morning EST, and it is comprised of a short list of art-related links to long-form articles, videos, blog posts or photo essays worth a second look.

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