News

Art Movements

by Allison Meier on July 18, 2014

"Mining Lamp" monument (Geleucht on the Halde Rheinpreußen in Germany) designed by Otto Piene. The artist passed away July 14) (via Wikimedia)

“Mining Lamp” monument (Geleucht on the Halde Rheinpreußen in Germany) designed by Otto Piene. The artist passed away July 14) (via Wikimedia)

Art Movements is a weekly collection of news, developments, and stirrings in the art world.

The Corcoran Gallery of Art filed a brief on Monday in Washington, DC Superior Court responding to a legal challenge from faculty, alumni, and others to its planned merger with the National Gallery and George Washington University. Meanwhile, the institution is expecting to shed 150 employees in the impending deal.

In January, the Detroit Institute of Arts announced it would contribute $100 million to the city’s “grand bargain” bankruptcy plan; the museum has now raised over $80 million, with an additional $26.8 million in corporate donations announced this week.

Hobby Lobby wants to build a Biblical museum near the National Mall in Washington, DC. The crafting store company recently won a Supreme Court case which ruled corporations could have religious stances, and thus don’t have to cover birth control under employee healthcare plans.

The first book printed in English — The Recuyell of the Histories of Troye from 1474 — sold for over $1.7 million at auction.

By October, 5Pointz in Long Island City will be completely demolished.

Thirteenth-century Byzantine frescoes were sent from the Menil Collection in Houston to Cyprus. The two frescoes were looted after the Turkish invasion in Cyprus, and later restored under the direction of Dominique de Menil in exchange for exhibiting them in Texas before their repatriation.

The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC opened UN archives on WWII war criminals to the public.

The British Museum has completed a £135m ($230m) expansion, adding conservation labs and significant storage space.

Architect Gene Kaufman is offering to purchase and restore Paul Rudolph’s 1967 Orange County Government Center in Goshen, New York. The Brutalist building has long been in limbo.

Rendering of BAM South in Downtown Brooklyn (via YIMBY/Curbed)

Rendering of BAM South in Downtown Brooklyn (via YIMBY/Curbed)

Renderings for BAM South — an architectural project in Downtown Brooklyn from Two Trees mixing apartments with cultural space — were revealed. The 32-story tower, which will rival the Williamsburgh Savings Bank for height, is planned for completion in 2016.

Bitforms Galley in Chelsea is relocating to a ground-floor space at 131 Allen Street on the Lower East Side, launching in September with a solo show from R. Luke DuBois.

Renzo Piano’s preliminary design for “Jurassica” — a dinosaur museum in Portland, England — was revealed. The plans turn a disused quarry into a subterranean realm of dinosaur animatronics and artifacts, planned to open in 2019 or 2020.

Martino Stierli is the new MoMA Chief Curator of Architecture and Design.

Massimiliano Gioni was promoted to Artistic Director at the New Museum.

German artist Otto Piene, known for his inflatable sculptures, illuminated installations, and paintings, died at the age of 86, just after the opening of his new exhibition at Berlin’s Neue Nationalgalerie.

Historian of art and fashion Anne Hollander died at the age of 83.

Anti-evolution politician Michael Peroutka donated a dinosaur skeleton appraised at $1 million to the Creation Museum in Kentucky, which believes the bones to be less than 5,000 years old.

A plan to make a museum of poet Wallace Stevens’s home in Hartford, Connecticut fell apart.

The New York Public Library is hosting Ghost Games as part of its NYPLarcade, a “book club, but for video games” targeted at adults, where independent games will be played and discussed.

Rhizome, along with Beijing-based Tsinghua Art and Science Media Laboratory (TASML) and, per Artnet, “a shadowy organization called CAT/CCIA,” announced a new prize for internet art — Prix Net Art — to be awarded three times from 2014 to 2016.

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