Thomas Micchelli

Alison Hall, “Brooklyn Nocturne XI, Smiling” (2015)

Alison Hall’s small, smart, monochromatic panels are clear, compact and not at all what they seem.

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Post image for Colored Dots and Brass Tacks: The Paintings of Andrew Forge

“They take a long time to make.” That’s what the British artist and writer Andrew Forge said when he was “questioned as to the meaning of his paintings,” according to an obituary that ran in The Telegraph

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Marino Marini,

VATICAN CITY — Modern art has achieved a slightly higher profile at the Vatican Museum these days (relatively speaking, of course): among other offerings, the recently opened Borgia apartments are currently filled with sometimes ordinary, sometimes exceptional selections of mid-20th-century Italian sculpture.

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Post image for The Uses of Enchantment: Filling an Empty Altarpiece

RAVELLO — There’s a deconsecrated chapel perched high on a cliff in Ravello, Italy, overlooking the Amalfi Coast.

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Roman fresco fragment

NAPLES — In the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, there’s a tiny Roman fresco, about a foot square, of a semi-nude woman and man floating against an azure sky, one of many such fragments you’ll find there.

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Double portrait of Pier Paolo Pasolini

ROME– Pier Paolo Pasolini is the JFK of Italy: a figure of courage and freedom for some; for others, a polarizing symbol of moral dissolution. His death, forty years ago this year, is still a source of debate.

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Post image for Speaking the Language of Paint: Karen Schwartz at Life on Mars

The paintings in Karen Schwartz’s show at Life on Mars are big, bold semi-abstractions that skate along the edge of chaos.

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Judith Bernstein,

Sometimes you think you have a handle on an artist’s work, and then a new piece of information comes along that casts it in an entirely different light.

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Utagawa (Gountei) Sadahide, “The Newly Opened Port of Yokohama in Kanagawa Prefecture” (1860)

Discovering Japanese Art: American Collectors and the Met is the unsexy title of a luxuriantly sensual exhibit that speaks with uncanny precision to our post-postmodern moment.

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Post image for The Triumph of Revisionism: The Whitney’s American Century

With America Is Hard to See, the exhibition inaugurating its luminous new Renzo Piano building, the Whitney has reclaimed its role among the city’s museums as the engine of the new.

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