Thomas Micchelli

Ye Qin Zhu, “Without colors” (2014)

Italo Calvino’s Cosmicomics, first published in 1968, is a collection of twelve tales — most of them narrated by an ancient, improbable being by the name of Qfwfq — that blend science fiction with fantasy and indulge in the mind-expanding ethos of the times.

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Andrew Ginzel, “Limen” (2009)

Cuts Noon Light is a sleek, smart, strikingly cohesive group show at Brian Morris Gallery featuring the work of three very different artists, Andrew Ginzel, Kara Rooney, and Steel Stillman. At once immediately familiar and decidedly alien, its hybrid objects foreground the unseen, the cryptic, and the elliptical.

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Brenda Goodman,

It may be a stretch to say that portraiture is in the air — given that there are all of two exhibitions devoted to it in New York City right now, one in Manhattan and one in Brooklyn — but their confluence can feel like the kind of Marxian (Groucho, not Karl) charge you get from watching a tradition-bound idiom seize up and explode.

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Post image for Staring Back: 400 Years of Portraits at the Morgan

Life Lines: Portrait Drawings from Dürer to Picasso at the Morgan Library & Museum may not venture very far beyond canonical European artists, but it uncovers richness and diversity within a circumscribed field, especially in the work of its two anchors, Albrecht Dürer and Pablo Picasso.

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Alison Hall, “Brooklyn Nocturne XI, Smiling” (2015)

Alison Hall’s small, smart, monochromatic panels are clear, compact and not at all what they seem.

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Post image for Colored Dots and Brass Tacks: The Paintings of Andrew Forge

“They take a long time to make.” That’s what the British artist and writer Andrew Forge said when he was “questioned as to the meaning of his paintings,” according to an obituary that ran in The Telegraph

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Marino Marini,

VATICAN CITY — Modern art has achieved a slightly higher profile at the Vatican Museum these days (relatively speaking, of course): among other offerings, the recently opened Borgia apartments are currently filled with sometimes ordinary, sometimes exceptional selections of mid-20th-century Italian sculpture.

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Post image for The Uses of Enchantment: Filling an Empty Altarpiece

RAVELLO — There’s a deconsecrated chapel perched high on a cliff in Ravello, Italy, overlooking the Amalfi Coast.

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Roman fresco fragment

NAPLES — In the Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, there’s a tiny Roman fresco, about a foot square, of a semi-nude woman and man floating against an azure sky, one of many such fragments you’ll find there.

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Double portrait of Pier Paolo Pasolini

ROME– Pier Paolo Pasolini is the JFK of Italy: a figure of courage and freedom for some; for others, a polarizing symbol of moral dissolution. His death, forty years ago this year, is still a source of debate.

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