Photo Essays

Post image for Thanksgiving Meals for Modern Artists

What would Vincent van Gogh’s Thanksgiving spread have looked like? Would Jackson Pollock have been as gestural in his deployment of gravy and cranberry sauce as he was with his paints?

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Post image for 19th-Century Photos of a Brooklyn Brownstone

The beautiful mansion that once stood at 353 Clinton Avenue in Clinton Hill in Brooklyn belonged to the industrialist William Henry Nichols, co-founder of the G. H. Nichols and Company. He was tremendously successful in the chemical business, as is plain to see from the plush interiors of his home.

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Post image for From Idaho to the Smithsonian, the Journey of James Castle

In 1899, in the remote Idahoan village of Garden Valley, James Castle was born completely deaf. For the rest of his life, he couldn’t hear, speak, read, or write. Our only glimpses into his mind are the drawings and collages he created using scavenged paper and soot mixed with his own spit.

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Photo Essays

The Faces of American Debt

by Laura C. Mallonee on November 18, 2014

Post image for The Faces of American Debt

Following the 2008 economic crisis, San Francisco-based photographer Brittany M. Powell had trouble finding full-time work.

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Post image for Capturing Love, Longing, and Disappearance in a Couple’s Last Days

In 2011, photographer Sarker Protick’s grandfather John developed cancer.

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Post image for Finding Refuge in Wyeth’s Windows

Over the course of his career, the 20th century American artist Andrew Wyeth created 300 drawings and paintings of windows that are more about the people looking out them than the views they depict.

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Post image for Strutting Between the Gorgeous and the Absurd

There’s something almost campy about a peacock. When it gets angry, the male bird’s plumes prickle up like a fan, and it lets out an unpleasant, guttural screech.

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Post image for Finding Community in the Picture Windows of Paris

Anonymity can be comfortable, though, which is why — for many of us at least — the desire to connect rarely propels us beyond a voyeuristic curiosity about the neighbors.

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Post image for An Alternative to the Art Fair Marathon

I didn’t expect to say this, but Independent Projects is a lovely fair. Started by the creators of the Independent, Armory Week’s alterna-fair, and taking place in the same location, the former Dia Art Foundation building on West 22nd Street in Chelsea, Independent Projects simultaneously builds on and slims down its sister fair’s model.

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Post image for In Jerusalem’s Old City, a Different Kind of Cubism

EAST JERUSALEM — Walking through the Muslim Quarter of Jerusalem’s Old City it is hard not be to fascinated by the folk paintings appearing on the homes of pilgrims who returned from the Hajj in Mecca.

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