Reviews

Books

A History of Art on the Final Frontier

by Allison Meier on December 18, 2014

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The first instance of a space discovery affecting art was likely 1608’s Somnium, a novel by astronomer Johannes Kepler about a trip to the moon following a pathway revealed by a demon. Ron Miller includes the curious story in The Art of Space, published this October by Zenith Press, which chronicles the history of artists interpreting the frontier beyond Earth’s atmosphere.

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Museums

The Accessories of Death

by Claire Voon on December 17, 2014

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While death and dying may not be popular topics of conversation today, mourning was a familiar act that developed into a social ritual in the 18th through early 20th century — particularly in the Western world — with high mortality rates and low life expectancies.

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Post image for When Painting Was an Unreasonable Vocation

In our times, the sincerity and passion of Ab-Ex look pretty good again, especially when the formal strengths of the work add up to more than just stylistic adventuring. Elizabeth Harris Gallery’s current show is a case in point.

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Museums

A Traditional Native Practice, Given Modern Form

by Erin Joyce on December 17, 2014

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SANTA FE — There are many facets to our identities and how we construct and define ourselves; one of the most integral is language.

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Post image for Douglas Gordon Goes Swimming in the Shallow End

In Claude Debussy’s 1910 prelude “La cathédrale engloutie” (“The Sunken Cathedral”), shuddering waves of chords grow and then drown out in tribute to a mythical cathedral rising out of the sea and then disappearing again. In Douglas Gordon’s new “tears become… streams become…” installation at the Park Avenue Armory, the rippling notes are provided each night by pianist Hélène Grimaud, who plays a Steinway encircled by a reflecting pool of 122,000 gallons of water.

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Galleries

The Colorful Past of Huguette Caland

by Hrag Vartanian on December 16, 2014

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For the last four decades, artist Huguette Caland has largely languished in obscurity.

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Post image for The Rude Underbelly of 19th-Century English Gentility

BATH, UK — The small city of Bath has over time become a symbol of classic English gentility and, at first glance, the Holburne Museum conforms to the pattern. But there is a temporary exhibition on display at the moment of prints by the caricaturist Thomas Rowlandson that undermines that whole myth of “Heritage England.”

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Galleries

Monochrome Sets You Free

by Robert C. Morgan on December 16, 2014

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I discovered the work of Ha Chonghyun in 2000 at an exhibition mounted at the Gwangju City Art Museum, curated by the art critic Yoon Jin Sup.

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Galleries

Jacolby Satterwhite Keeps Reality Virtual

by Alicia Eler on December 15, 2014

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LOS ANGELES — Jacolby Satterwhite’s solo exhibition How lovly is me being as I am is born out of a maternal virtual hive mind.

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Post image for Order and Disorder in Albert Oehlen’s Fabric Paintings

Albert Oehlen’s current show at Skarstedt, a selection of 14 “fabric paintings” made between 1992–96, is explosive. Explosive as in a burst or the arrival of a fiery red comet on earth.

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