Reviews

Post image for Lively Artworks That Make Room for the Mind

There is this one particular color of paint that appears in many of the paintings by Etel Adnan on view right now at Galerie Lelong in New York.

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Post image for Art X Detroit Lives Up to the City’s Vibrant Cultural Life

DETROIT — Trying to notice the impact of the Kresge Foundation on the arts in Detroit is like a fish trying to notice water.

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Post image for A Warhol-Inspired Performance Pops in the Wrong Ways

In general, it’s very difficult to assume the mantle of a Warholian legacy.

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Post image for In Paintings and Collage, the Beginnings of a New Language

The German artist Charline von Heyl’s current show, Dusseldörf, currently on view at Petzel’s new uptown gallery, presents a group of von Heyl’s early collages and paintings from 1990–1995.

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Post image for Relishing in the Habsburg Dynasty’s Decadent Legacy

MINNEAPOLIS — “Make love not war,” the ‘60s era anti-war slogan, could have been the official credo of the noble House of Habsburg.

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Post image for You’ve Been Shot by a Smooth Photographer: The World of Michael Jackson Impersonators

Lorena Turner’s book The Michael Jacksons is the end product of a journey to track down, photograph, and interview Michael Jackson impersonators.

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Post image for With the Help of Prosthetics and Psychics, a Photographer Dramatizes His Possible Fates

After photographer Phil Toledano experienced both the sudden death of his mother and the slower, drawn out demise of his father, he became obsessed with his own potential futures.

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Post image for A Personal Journey Through the Legacy of Apartheid

Catherine Taylor’s book centers on her search — what feels like an obsessive search — through veins of history buried in the time of apartheid in South Africa, where she and her family are from.

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Post image for The Serious Business of ‘New Yorker’ Cartoons

“Cartoons either make the strange familiar or the familiar strange,” says New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff in Leah Wolchok’s documentary about the magazine’s enduring cartoon department, Very Semi-Serious.

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Post image for An Artist Considers the Trauma of His Two Homelands

LONDON — “Nagorno” is a Russian word for “mountain,” while “Karabakh” is a word of Turkic and Persian origin meaning “black garden.” When joined by a hyphen, the two words denote the boiling point of the Caucasus: Nagorno-Karabakh, a disputed enclave — one of post-Soviet Europe’s “frozen conflicts” — that doubles as a mountainous graveyard.

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