Books

Post image for You’ve Been Shot by a Smooth Photographer: The World of Michael Jackson Impersonators

Lorena Turner’s book The Michael Jacksons is the end product of a journey to track down, photograph, and interview Michael Jackson impersonators.

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Post image for A Personal Journey Through the Legacy of Apartheid

Catherine Taylor’s book centers on her search — what feels like an obsessive search — through veins of history buried in the time of apartheid in South Africa, where she and her family are from.

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Post image for Photographs Document the Global Traditions of Living with the Dead

Memento Mori: The Dead Among Us, a photography book by Paul Koudounaris out this month from Thames & Hudson, is a visual narrative of how a more visceral relationship to the dead thrives across the globe.

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Post image for A Poetic Record of Creations Lost, Missing, or Destroyed

Rarely has a book been so dizzyingly impenetrable while being, at the same time, so eminently readable. Les Unités perdus (The lost unities), by the French poet Henri Lefebvre, manages to both live up to this paradox and flourish within its idiosyncratic ramparts.

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Post image for A Comic Draws on the Dark Side of Hollywood’s Golden Age

When the double-sized first issue of The Fade Out surfaced last summer — an ongoing comic noir set in 1940s Los Angeles — a share of the print run featured a limited-edition cover (commonly called a “variant” cover).

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Post image for A Graphic Novel Portrait of Slavery in Brazil

The history of black slavery in Brazil has largely been told from the perspective of the colonizers, not the enslaved.

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Post image for The Mystery of the Painter of Light™

Thomas Kinkade was a painter of cabins, lighthouses, and improvable sunsets. He was an avowed evangelical Christian who fortified his saccharine landscapes with passages from the scriptures.

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Post image for The Sibling Rivalry that Shaped Diane Arbus’s Vision

In Silent Dialogues, art historian Alexander Nemerov, son of former US Poet Laureate Howard Nemerov and nephew of Diane Arbus, traces his father’s evolving attitudes toward photography and his sister’s work in particular.

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Post image for The Bleak Banality of Shopping in Communist Europe

“In a cityscape largely without commercial seduction, the banality of the shop windows underscored a real cultural difference between East and West,” photographer David Hlynsky writes in his introduction to Window-Shopping Through the Iron Curtain.

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Post image for Contemporary Photography’s Capitalist Realism

In Caspar David Friedrich’s “Frau vor untergehender Sonne” (“Woman before the Rising Sun”), a young woman is depicted facing the rising sun, which turns her almost completely, but not entirely, into a silhouette.

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