Books

Post image for Fables from Artlandia: The Miraculous by Raphael Rubinstein

In a 1946 letter to the anthropologist Ruth Benedict, poet Charles Olson articulated what has become a quietly influential conception of historiography in poetry circles. “There has been, is too much of everything, including knowledge,” he contended, quite presciently, “because it has not been winnowed.”

Continue Reading →

Books

A History of Art on the Final Frontier

by Allison Meier on December 18, 2014

Post image for A History of Art on the Final Frontier

The first instance of a space discovery affecting art was likely 1608’s Somnium, a novel by astronomer Johannes Kepler about a trip to the moon following a pathway revealed by a demon. Ron Miller includes the curious story in The Art of Space, published this October by Zenith Press, which chronicles the history of artists interpreting the frontier beyond Earth’s atmosphere.

Continue Reading →
Cover of

Dorothy Iannone describes her trip to Reykjavík in 1967 as the “journey which seems to have made all other journeys possible.” It was there she met the artist Dieter Roth, with whom she swiftly fell in love and for whom she left her husband and a comfortable life in the United States.

Continue Reading →
Post image for A Portrait of the 21st-Century Alps, Where Glaciers Retreat and Concrete Advances

The Alps today are different mountains from when the first 19th-century photographers hoisted heavy plate cameras up their craggy sides. Glaciers are in retreat, ski resorts are firmly lodged into slopes, and human infrastructure crawls back and forth steadily up their inclines.

Continue Reading →

Books

The Original Renaissance Man and His Brain

by John Seed on December 10, 2014

Post image for The Original Renaissance Man and His Brain

LOS ANGELES — As he raced against cancer to finish his fourth and final book, Leonardo’s Brain, author/inventor/surgeon Leonard Shlain was motivated by the possibility that his manuscript-in-progress might help answer a very vital question: How can mankind achieve a more creative and peaceful future?

Continue Reading →

Books

Photographers Expose Their Processes

by Allison Meier on December 10, 2014

Post image for Photographers Expose Their Processes

Some photographers take relentless notes in pocket journals, others share their discoveries in real time on Instagram. The two methods are different approaches to the contemporary photographic process, which is the subject of a new book, Photographers’ Sketchbooks, by Stephen McLaren and Bryan Formhals.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Inflatable Corsets, Ventilated Top Hats, and Other Failed Victorian Inventions

Many great inventions came out of the Victorian era, from the photograph to the electric lightbulb. The elastic opera hat and the anti-cholera belt, however, are not among their illustrious numbers.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Grappling with a Family Ghost in an Interactive Photography Project

Photographer McNair Evans’s faith in his father was rattled when the patriarch died and the secret of the family agricultural business being near insolvency was revealed.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Does It Suck? Another Look at ‘Showgirls’

Long brushed off as a horrendous excuse for a film, Paul Verhoeven and Joe Eszterhas’s epic flop Showgirls may have more than meets the eye. Or, at least, its vulgar superficiality may be worth critical re-evaluation

Continue Reading →
Trevor Winkfield,

While visiting Philadelphia a number of years ago, the poet and critic Wayne Koestenbaum asked me “Is Trevor Winkfield a real person?”

Continue Reading →