Books

Post image for Reader’s Diary: Frank Lima’s ‘Incidents of Travel in Poetry’

“There are several Puerto / Ricans on the avenue today, which / makes it beautiful and warm,” wrote Frank O’Hara in “A Step Away from Them.” It was 1956, the day after Jackson Pollock’s funeral.

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BooksWeekend

Foreign Sounds or Sounds Foreign

by John Yau on August 28, 2016

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Brandon Som’s first book of poems, The Tribute Horse, won the 2012 Nightboat Poetry Prize.

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Post image for The Poetics of Embodiment: Elaine Kahn’s ‘Women in Public’

The poems in Elaine Kahn’s Women in Public are highly self-aware. They’re porous, riven with gaps and fragmentation; at the same time, they’re unquestionably “lyrical” in their concision and fluidity

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Post image for A Graphic Novel Chronicles Woody Guthrie’s Dust Bowl Years

Woody Guthrie was responding to the hardships of the Great Depression, but he may as well have been singing about now.

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Post image for Reader’s Diary: ‘The Brexit Crisis’

The presses roll fast when there are no presses to roll.

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BooksWeekend

America’s Philosopher Poet

by John Yau on August 21, 2016

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The Swimmer is John Koethe’s tenth book of poetry. For many years, he was Distinguished Professor of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee until he retired in 2010.

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Post image for Cosmic Wind: Yoshimasu Gozo’s ‘Alice Iris Red Horse’

In 2003 I received an invitation to attend a reading by the poet Yoshimasu Gozo, someone I had never heard of. I asked around, and was told that Gozo was an avant-garde poet who read in a bygone oracular style.

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Post image for Reader’s Diary: Darryl Pinckney’s ‘Black Deutschland’

This is not so much a second novel as a mature reimagining of what a youthful first novel might have been.

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Post image for The Deceptively Cheerful Stripes of Deadly Fumigation Tents

You’d think that fun lies with their walls of colorful stripes, but inside the bright tents is the deadly gas of sulfuryl fluoride, quietly building up to eliminate nesting drywood termites.

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Post image for Retracing a Lifetime of Urban Activism Through Jane Jacob’s Last Interview

“The kind of planning for a city that would really work would be a sort of informed, intelligent improvisation, which is what most of our planning in life is in any case,” said Jane Jacobs in a 1962 interview with Mademoiselle, conducted just after the 1961 publication of her influential The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

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