Books

BooksWeekend

Language as Maternal

by Barry Schwabsky on January 18, 2015

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George Oppen published his first book, Discrete Series, in 1934; his second, The Materials, emerged 28 years later, in 1962. But even Oppen and Bunting were raring to go in comparison to Wong May, whose third collection of poems, Superstitions, came out in 1978.

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Post image for Topless but Far From Helpless: Charlotte Moorman’s Avant-Garde Life

So-called revisionist art history has made room for numerous, formerly overlooked or ignored artists in Western Civ’s recognized canon, but what is that establishment narrative to make of a big-boned Southern gal who played avant-garde cello in the nude while submerged in a Plexiglas tank filled with river water?

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Books

The Writings of a Passionate Painter

by John Goodrich on January 16, 2015

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Pick up a survey of modern art, start scanning the 1930s, and you may come across a paragraph or two on the French painter Jean Hélion (1904–1987).

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Post image for An Out-of-Focus Look at Post-Photography

Tacking “post” onto a word is one of those art world tricks that’s routinely wielded to great rhetorical effect, but has little denotative meaning. In much the same way, Robert Shore’s book featuring the term, Post-Photography: The Artist with a Camera, jumps off the shelves with its punchy title but fails to provide much substance.

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BooksWeekend

Anselm Berrigan’s Ambivalence about Words

by John Yau on January 4, 2015

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I am going to start with a “Note for poems” that Anselm Berrigan wrote about his most recent book, Pregrets.

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Post image for Language Lessons: The Poetry of Bob Brown

In his 1974 anthology Revolution of the World: A New Gathering of American Avant Garde Poetry 1914–1945, Jerome Rothenberg introduced American poet Bob Brown to those of us of a certain generation, hinting at the wealth of visual poems the man had created and describing his writing, based mostly on the poet’s 1916 collection, My Marjonary (announced for publication by my own Green Integer press), as bearing close kinship with the later New York School writers.

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Books

Best of 2014: Our Top 10 Art Books

by Hyperallergic on December 31, 2014

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There’s never a shortage of art books, but it is often hard to find the best in a field flooded with vanity projects, sales tools, and books that promise so much more than they deliver.

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Post image for Photographing the Crossroads of Life and Death in South Africa

Beginning in the 1940s, South African photographer David Goldblatt documented the people and landscapes of his country in striking black and white. It was only after apartheid that he felt comfortable with color in his work.

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Post image for Fables from Artlandia: The Miraculous by Raphael Rubinstein

In a 1946 letter to the anthropologist Ruth Benedict, poet Charles Olson articulated what has become a quietly influential conception of historiography in poetry circles. “There has been, is too much of everything, including knowledge,” he contended, quite presciently, “because it has not been winnowed.”

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Books

A History of Art on the Final Frontier

by Allison Meier on December 18, 2014

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The first instance of a space discovery affecting art was likely 1608’s Somnium, a novel by astronomer Johannes Kepler about a trip to the moon following a pathway revealed by a demon. Ron Miller includes the curious story in The Art of Space, published this October by Zenith Press, which chronicles the history of artists interpreting the frontier beyond Earth’s atmosphere.

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