Books

Post image for Quiet Drawings from a Life Lost in Mental Institutions

In one of the drawings discovered in a well-worn album, fished out of the trash in 1970 by a teenager in Springfield, Missouri, a wide-eyed woman points to a bouquet of flowers below the words “ECTLECTRC PENCIL.”

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Post image for The Rose-Washed Past: Ron Haviv’s ‘Lost Rolls’

I’ve long been fascinated by the various filters for Instagram and other digital camera apps whose names are simply years: 1969, 1972, 1977.

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Post image for An Eccentric Visual History of Our Most Basic Shapes

In the 1960s, Italian artist Bruno Munari explored the visual history of the square, circle, and triangle in three books, which Princeton Architectural Press recently compiled.

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Post image for “Exactly as It Was”: Ellsworth Kelly’s Basic Training

When art world luminary, Ellsworth Kelly, died in December at the age of 92, his obituaries described him as an artist who rejected the very idea of art as self-expression.

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Books

The Humble Art of Decorated Paper

by Allison Meier on January 29, 2016

Post image for The Humble Art of Decorated Paper

In April of 1789, a few months before the storming of the Bastille, the paper factory of Jean-Baptiste Réveillon in Paris was taken over by labor protestors, who commandeered the machines to print paper in red, white, and blue.

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Post image for A Post-Apocalyptic Graphic Novel by a “Disappeared” Argentinian Writer

It’s as if Oesterheld was telegraphing in The Eternaut the horrors that would befall him at the hands of his own repellent government.

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Post image for The First Flash Photographs of the Natural World At Night

With a magnesium flash triggered by a tripwire, George Shiras shot some of the world’s first nocturnal wildlife photographs.

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Post image for How Graphic Designers Around the World Interpret Shakespeare

When the Globe Theatre along London’s River Thames opened in 1599, a flag depicting Hercules hoisting a globe announced the opening of William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar.

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Post image for The Many Identities of Raphael’s “Lady with a Unicorn”

The 16th-century “Portrait of a Lady with a Unicorn” by Raphael was altered twice: first by the artist, who replaced a lap dog with a tiny unicorn; then in the 17th century, when the sitter’s bare shoulders were covered and the broken martyrdom wheel of St. Catherine of Alexandria was painted over the mythical creature.

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Post image for Revisiting the Nuclear Arms Race in 150 Business Cards

Los Alamos Rolodex: Doing Business with the National Lab, a new book by the Center for Land Use Interpretation (CLUI), is a tight little publication with a singular fascination.

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