Museums

Post image for The Origins and Evolution of Group Zero

There are undoubtedly many stories attributed to the founding of ZERO in post-World War II Germany, as there were with the inception of Dada during the earlier Great War that raged outside the Swiss borders from 1914–18.

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Museums

Nam June Paik’s Robot Dreams

by Julia Friedman on November 19, 2014

Post image for Nam June Paik’s Robot Dreams

Nam June Paik: Becoming Robot, organized by the Asia Society Museum, is the first solo show of the Korean-born artist in New York City since his celebrated 2000 Guggenheim retrospective.

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Post image for Harun Farocki and Antje Ehmann Arrive at Work

BOSTON — Two factory doors swing open and a rabble emerges. French workers literally stream out into the world in a seemingly choreographed departure after a long day at work.

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Post image for Pedestrian Art, Between Transportation and Perspective

LOS ANGELES — The crisply focused exhibition Following the Prescribed Path takes place in a city that is notoriously sprawling and impractical for long-distance walking.

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Post image for In the Relics of a Desert Utopia, a More Sustainable Future

It never reached the 5,000 inhabitants its creator dreamed of or produced much more than decorative wind-chimes, but the utopian city of Arcosanti may have just been ahead of its time. Designed by Italian architect Paolo Soleri, the compact metropolis was the embodiment of his idea of “arcology” — a fusion of architecture with ecology.

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Post image for The Very Modern Portraits of Egon Schiele

The central question of portraiture is how to best turn its subjects inside out — how to best manipulate an inanimate medium so as to capture an animate sitter with a hidden history of invisible experience.

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Museums

Disinterring the Lost Glamor of Grief

by Allison Meier on November 11, 2014

Post image for Disinterring the Lost Glamor of Grief

Grief hit what may be its peak of glamor between 1815 and 1915. The devastating losses of the Civil War, suppression of women’s rights, and Victorian and Edwardian affinity for the macabre resulted in generations of widows spending years in their dour “weeds.”

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Pablo Picasso,

“To a new world of gods and monsters” is the promethean pledge from one mad scientist to another in James Whale’s classic Bride of Frankenstein (1935), but it’s easy to imagine the same toast echoing from a Montmartre studio in 1909 as Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque raise a glass to the fractured new reality they’d uncovered.

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Chinese American: Inclusion/Exclusion

Chinese American consciously simulates the American immigrant’s journey: hope, dehumanization, mixed blessings; individual narratives that together paint the greater arc of America.

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Egon Schiele,

Despite its inclusion of more than 130 works on paper and canvas, the ravishing retrospective Egon Schiele: Portraits, occupying the third floor of New York’s Neue Galerie, leaves you hungry. Not for more art, because there’s plenty of that, but for something else, something to make whole an ineffable absence — a deficit attributable not to the artist, nor to the exhibition or curator, but to time and fate.

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