Museums

Post image for The Overlooked Elegance of Japanese Pattern Books

The major difference between this and other exhibitions of Japanese moku hanga (woodblock printing) is that the prints were all made as pattern and design books for the Japanese textile market.

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Museums

Broadcasting Los Angeles

by Abe Ahn on July 28, 2014

KCHUNG TV stage at Made in L.A. 2014

LOS ANGELES — One of the first objects on display at the Hammer Museum’s Made in L.A. biennial is a Volkswagen Brasilia, named after the Brazilian capital.

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Varhram Aghasyan, “Museum of the Revolution”

TBILISI, Georgia — This week in Tbilisi, there are two exhibitions worth checking out. They make a nice pairing for an afternoon, as the first deals with public memory while the second is a very intimate examination of hidden experience. Both are singular in that they reflect life in the Caucasus region yet have universal relevance.

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Museums

Minor White’s Vulnerability

by Alicia Eler on July 25, 2014

Minor White, “Untitled (composite print)” (1973)

LOS ANGELES — Minor White’s photographs offer a portrait of a life lived in collaboration with the natural world, other people, and the great beyond. This collection of crisp photographs make up the retrospective Manifestations of the Spirit.

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Museums

Malevich in his Milieu

by Eva Bezverkhny on July 24, 2014

Kazimir Malevich,

LONDON — The Tate Modern’s Malevich: Revolutionary of Russian Art exhibition explores the career of Kazimir Malevich, presenting a complete image of the painter, sculptor, teacher, and revolutionary member of the early Soviet avant-garde, whose trajectory as an innovative artist mirrored the tumultuous decades surrounding the Soviet revolution.

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Post image for How a Turn-of-the-Century Painter Influenced Military Camouflage

The newest exhibition at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum in New York examines the influence of nature on military camouflage.

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John Altoon,

LOS ANGELES — In John Altoon’s current retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, curator Carol S. Eliel organizes a view of this Los Angeles artist’s work that spans from his early beginnings in art — heavy strokes of more Cubist-type work — to his delicate, sexually charged ink and watercolors leading up to his death.

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Chiaki Kamikawa, “10 Possible Locations for Secret Talks” (2014), number 6 of 10 drawings, pencil on paper, approximately 8 3/10 x 9 1/10 inches

Simultaneously confounding and illuminating, The Intuitionists at the Drawing Center is a puzzle within a puzzle, a conceptual stunt that raises sticky questions about curatorial responsibility and the structuring of aesthetic experience.

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Frank Gehry's design for new Philadelphia Museum of Art

PHILADELPHIA — With all of the gratuitous snark surrounding the recent work of Frank O. Gehry, the expansion and modernization of the Philadelphia Museum of Art will most likely glide under the radar of his usual detractors.

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Post image for The Birth and Education of Judy Chicago

Judy Chicago, arguably the world’s best known Feminist artist, continues to fiercely divide opinion. Her detractors accuse her work of being simplistic and singleminded, while loyalists praise her unwavering activism. The artist has fostered a reputation for being independent and uncompromising.

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