Museums

Post image for The Meaning of the Ring, from Memento Mori to Marriage

Rings are one of the most personal and oldest human adornments, evolving in complexity with metalwork techniques and the gemstone trade.

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Post image for Yasuo Kuniyoshi Retrospective Places the Painter at the Center of Modern Art in the US

WASHINGTON, DC — In 1948, Yasuo Kuniyoshi was the first living artist to receive a retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art and that was the last time his career was thoroughly explored before this year’s exhibition at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

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Post image for How Women Artists Have Explored Nature’s Unruly Side

WASHINGTON, DC — Dual exhibitions at the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) in Washington, DC, challenge the artistic interpretation of nature by women as something always beautiful and fragile.

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Jacob Lawrence, “The Migration Series” (1940-41), panel 52

Spring, 1968. All my students were black, and I wasn’t. Jacob Lawrence, who was teaching a course down the hall from me at Pratt Institute, was a famous artist and a real teacher; I wasn’t either of those things.

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Post image for A Rooftop Installation at the Metropolitan Museum Considers Manhattan’s Prehistory

This summer’s rooftop installation by French artist Pierre Huyghe at the Metropolitan Museum of Art digs into the primordial history of Manhattan.

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Post image for Seven Museums Each Tackle a Deadly Sin

The Fairfield Westchester Museum Alliance (FWMA), a recently formed consortium of museums located just north of New York City, chose to inaugurate its new partnership with simultaneous exhibitions designed to address a widely known if archaic catalogue of human foibles known as the Seven Deadly Sins.

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Post image for The Gore and Agony of New Baroque Sculptures at the Met

Baroque Spanish sculpture was long considered gaudy and secondary to the paintings of the same era but that is changing.

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Post image for New York’s Cathedral of Science Reopens with Interactive Ecology Beneath the Stars

The Great Hall at the New York Hall of Science in Queens was designed to give visitors to the 1964 World’s Fair the feeling of floating in deep space.

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Post image for A Once Shattered Statue Is Now Part of a Theatrical Experiment at the Metropolitan Museum

How many times is a sculpture sculpted?

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Agnes Denes,

With “Living Pyramid” (2015), Agnes Denes’s first large-scale public sculpture in New York City since she planted and harvested an amber field in the Battery Park Landfill (“Wheatfield – A Confrontation,” 1982), the artist merges botanicals with her interest in mathematics.

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