Theaters

Theaters

An Opera of Love Songs to Science

by Allison Meier on April 14, 2016

Post image for An Opera of Love Songs to Science

“Maybe there’s a physicist sitting right beside you, who can explain this better than we do, but we’re in the business of art, so we’ll make a metaphor,” sings Hai-Ting Chinn in Science Fair: An Opera With Experiments.

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Post image for Six Characters in Search of a Puppetmaster

Luigi Pirandello’s iconic play Six Characters in Search of an Author (1921) is being reimagined at La MaMa this month.

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Post image for Camera Obscura: Jackie Sibblies Drury’s ‘Really’

Really by Jackie Sibblies Drury had its world premiere at Abrons Arts Center on March 18.

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Post image for An Immersive Theater Trip to a 1970s Tropical Paradise

Only minutes after walking through a hallway painted like the cabin of an airplane and handing my mock boarding pass to a charming man in a Hawaiian shirt, who greeted me with a lei, I was in a secret room getting a tarot reading.

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Post image for Singing the Struggles of Trans People in the American South

On the surface, the new musical Southern Comfort has all the trappings of a conventional family drama.

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Post image for Restaging a 1979 Dance, Designed by Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg worked with dancers?

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Post image for A Sultry and Subversive ‘Snow White,’ with Ball Gags and Pole Dancing

How many times you heard the tale of Snow White? Surely you remember the pole dancing, the wigs made of large birdcages, and the lithe male bodies dusted with gold.

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Post image for A Production of ‘Elektra’ Where the Performers Yell at You

In the second half of the performance, the conflict extended beyond the bounds of the play, past the stage, and into the real.

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Post image for Splendor Is Never Enough: ‘Manon Lescaut’ at the Metropolitan Opera

The Met’s new production of Puccini’s Manon Lescaut, directed by Richard Eyre, takes place in a meticulously, even extravagantly realized World-War-II France, with sidewalk cafes and lots of Nazis.

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Post image for Injecting Conversations on Gender, Race, and Gay Rights into Thornton Wilder’s ‘Our Town’

If the function of architecture is to create contemplative spaces, then the theater has become a place for ghosts.

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