Books

Post image for Illustrated Dolphins and Vampire Squid from the Dawn of Ocean Exploration

In the 16th century, Pierre Belon published one of the earliest scientific depictions of a dolphin: a woodcut with finely hatched skin and pointed teeth.

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Post image for Scarred Rejects from the Farm Security Administration’s Great Depression Photos

Spend some time browsing the 145,000 negatives at the Library of Congress from the Farm Security Administration (FSA) and an odd pattern will emerge.

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Post image for The 9th-Century Islamic “Instrument Which Plays by Itself”

In the 9th century, the Banū Mūsā brothers in Baghdad designed a mechanical, hydraulic organ that was made to play endlessly by itself.

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Post image for Uncovering a Manifesto in the Blog of Visionary Architect Lebbeus Woods

From 2007 to 2012, the late architect Lebbeus Woods kept a blog that offered a peek into the mind of one of our most visionary contemporary creators.

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Post image for A Tribute to New York’s Wilting Flower District

If cities had such things as official botanicals, New York City’s might be the flower bouquet.

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Post image for Bright Lights, Blinged Bible at the Morgan Library

The 9th-century Lindau Gospels, named for its former home at the Lindau Abbey on Lake Constance in Germany, wasn’t the first book J. Pierpont Morgan purchased for his library, but in the collections of the Morgan Library & Museum, it’s labeled “MS M. 1.”

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Books

Art Nouveau’s Deep Sea Muse

by Allison Meier on March 22, 2016

Post image for Art Nouveau’s Deep Sea Muse

Art Nouveau’s organic shapes surfaced thanks to some underwater inspiration.

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Post image for Rethinking Life Beneath Our Cities’ Concrete Overpasses

With the rapid development of transportation infrastructure in the 20th century, much of our urban land was shrouded in shadow.

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Post image for Plumage of the Saints: Aztec Feather Art in the Age of Colonialism

In a 16th-century triptych of the crucifixion at the Musée National de la Renaissance, north of Paris, Christ has wings. In fact the whole piece is made of feathers.

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Post image for The Origins of Eero Saarinen’s TWA Terminal in a One-Legged Chair

When the TWA Flight Center opened in 1962 at New York’s JFK Airport, its swooping form seemed to embody flight itself, with its two white wings rising from the tarmac.

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