Cady Noland


The Art of Cady Noland as Poison Pill

by Seph Rodney on July 21, 2015

Post image for The Art of Cady Noland as Poison Pill

Cady Noland has reportedly stirred up a kerfuffle around the sale of her work to a major collector.

Continue Reading →


Crimes of the Art

by Benjamin Sutton on June 30, 2015

Post image for Crimes of the Art

On this week’s art crime blotter: artist sues Starbucks over “Mini Frappuccino” design, staff at Spanish tourist destination use audio guides to launder money, and the creator of the giant inflatable rubber duck sculptures disowns one of his ducklings.

Continue Reading →
Rirkrit Tiravanija

A few months after having been roundly trounced for The Forever Now: Painting in an Atemporal World, its attempt to assess the current state of painting, the Museum of Modern Art opened a reinstallation of its contemporary collection on the same day as its Björk fiasco.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Cady Noland and Diane Arbus Make a Picnic Out of You

The current show at Gagosian, Portraits of America: Diane Arbus/Cady Noland is in a small gallery reachable only by walking into and through the Gagosian’s Upper East Side gift shop. In order to see the exhibition, to enter the gallery, one must first pass through this physical barrier.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Context and Silence: On the Art Writings of Eva Hesse and Cady Noland

How important is it to control one’s image, to have mastery over one’s oeuvre? As a female artist, to allow one’s life and work to merge is risky. It is a softness.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Marc Jancou, Cady Noland, and the Case of the Authorless Artwork

SOMERVILLE, Mass. — Ending not with a bang but a whimper, the last bit of legal wrangling in the case that pitted collector Marc Jancou against Cady Noland and Sotheby’s was quietly settled on November 11.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Photo Preview: “NYC 1993” at the New Museum

Opening tonight, the New Museum’s NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star purports to offer a time capsule, or, as the museum’s curator Gary Carrion-Murayari put it, a “form of collective memory” documenting a particular time in a particular art scene, namely, New York City in the ’90s.

Continue Reading →