Catherine Morris

Post image for The Birth and Education of Judy Chicago

Judy Chicago, arguably the world’s best known Feminist artist, continues to fiercely divide opinion. Her detractors accuse her work of being simplistic and singleminded, while loyalists praise her unwavering activism. The artist has fostered a reputation for being independent and uncompromising.

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Post image for Filling in the Gaps: Feminism’s Continued Relevance in the Arts

This past weekend I joined the audience for the day of panel discussions at the Brooklyn Museum organized by The Feminist Art Project as part of the annual College Art Association Conference. I was only able to stay for the first three and a half panels, in a day that included five. But in those three and a half panels, a clear through-line started to emerge, at least from my perspective. That through-line involved the idea of creating collective histories, of asserting a history that complicates singular narratives, and that makes it clear that whole communities of differing experience and perspective participate in the making and supporting of the arts.

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