Digital Art

Post image for After Blockbuster Kickstarter, Electric Objects Is Appealing to Artists

It’s long been a dream of digital art lovers to easily display internet-based art, so it was no surprise that Electric Objects, a company developing a dedicated high-definition screen and integrated computer to bring art from the internet into the home, quickly blew past its initial Kickstarter goal of $25,000 to raise almost half a million dollars.

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Post image for Wade Guyton and the Post-Media Question

PARIS — A backshift in the Parisian weather, from spring warm sun to cold gray, complemented the opening of Wade Guyton’s back-titled 26 avril – 7 juin 2008 exhibition at Galerie Chantal Crousel perfectly.

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Post image for A Journal for Art That’s Purely Digital

LOS ANGELES — Artists who work in the digital realm are increasingly gaining recognition with exhibitions, auctions, and biennials. A new artist/writer-led online magazine called NOOART: The Journal of Objectless Art seeks to further the discussion about this type of work.

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Post image for Flowers Grown from the Topography of a Museum

These are flowers grown from a museum, where the colors, textures, and shapes of exhibitions guided each petal, stem, and branch. British designer Daniel Brown has spent a decade creating these generated plants through an algorithm where mathematics and nature overlap.

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Online

A Deep Dive into Digital Art

by Jillian Steinhauer on December 24, 2013

Post image for A Deep Dive into Digital Art

Some people spend Christmas Eve going to mass or sitting around a tree; others spend it eating Chinese food and going to see a movie. If you don’t have any family or friend traditions to adhere to, or if you do but want an escape, one possibility I’d recommend is to spend this late afternoon/evening digging into digital art via The Wrong, a new online biennial.

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Articles

Artists Auction Their Facebook Profiles

by An Xiao on November 19, 2013

Post image for Artists Auction Their Facebook Profiles

Organized by Bailey, Mathé and Hunt, a one-day event placed artists’ social media profiles up for bidding.

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Post image for A Digital Artist Goes Analogue, but the Message Is Fuzzy

Sitting in the audience for the performance of Ann Hirsch’s “Playground” at the New Museum last week, two things came to mind: one, that Hirsch had managed to trick a bunch of art school kids and fans of her often web-based art into coming to a very conventional theater production; and two, that the plot of her play felt a little conservative, despite Hirsch’s larger body of work that seeks to question representations of female minds, bodies, and sexualities on the internet.

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Post image for Shoot for the Stars: First GIF Shared in Space

To launch a project that will crowdsource digital media projected into space, it makes sense to start with a GIF, the most beloved manifestation of our current internet noise. Today the first GIF to ever be sent into space started a journey to a distant solar system — which it will reach in 2031.

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Post image for A Futuristic Ghost Story with Many Layers

To tackle the anxiety of online identity and the constant torrential rain of information, artist Toni Dove has orchestrated a ghost story. It’s a spectral experience that spills from video screens that raise from the floor and hover from the ceiling, blending in live soundtracking, robotics, motion-sensing animation, and a whole cavalcade of integrated technology that comes together more like a sci-fi symphony than a replica of all that online noise. I recently visited Dove’s studio in Lower Manhattan, where she demonstrated the technology behind Lucid Possession and discussed her continuously evolving new media-based work.

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Post image for Tracing a Path from Cubism to Digital Art

I first learned about Cubism in an art history class my sophomore year of college. I remember the moment of revelation, after reading a lot about but still failing to grasp what exactly Picasso and Braque were after. In the darkened lecture hall one afternoon, our teacher summed it up this way: how sparingly could you paint a face while still having the viewer understand it as a face? What was the bare minimum required for representation? As legend has it, these questions and the art they inspired changed the course of art history forever.

Is the same true of the digital revolution? That’s the premise of Decenter, an exhibition curated Andrianna Campbell and Daniel S. Palmer and currently on view at the Abrons Arts Center.

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