High Line

Post image for Artist Prepares to Sue High Line Over Alleged Assault

The artist who claims that he was attacked by a maintenance employee on the High Line last month is planning to sue over the incident. Iddi Amadu, an immigrant from Ghana who sells his art on the High Line, is bringing a suit against Friends of the High Line, the organization that runs the park, as well as the city and the Parks Department, in the hopes of being compensated for his injuries and destroyed artwork, DNAinfo reports.

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Post image for Park Employee Assaults Art Vendor on the High Line

The High Line has a reputation for being an artsy park, located as it is partly in the Chelsea gallery neighborhood, with rotating art exhibitions and sculpture and video installations. But apparently the park isn’t quite as arts-friendly as it would have us believe: a week and a half ago, an art vendor on the High Line was attacked by a maintenance worker. The park employee hit the vendor in the face with a walkie-talkie, leaving him in need of an ambulance and stitches.

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Galleries

Fear and Loathing at :)

by Emily Colucci on August 5, 2011

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Drawn by an over-900 people attending Facebook events page and a plug on GAYLETTER two months ago, I wandered into the opening of :) by FriendsWithYou at The Hole and left feeling a mixture of what Dr. Hunter S. Thompson described as “fear and loathing.” Now, a few days before the exhibition’s closing, I revisited :) to see if my opinion of the art would change without the unseasonable near 100 degree heat, crowded gallery and drunkenness. It didn’t.

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Reactor

The High Line Gets Drrrty

by Kyle Chayka on June 21, 2011

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The High Line Section 2 is New York City’s latest stab at utopia, so it only makes sense that people love it. But maybe they love it a little too much? Gothamist publishes a photo essay of couples canoodling on the High Line lawn, and all of a sudden, the lawn gets closed for cleaning. Cleaning of what, exactly?

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Post image for Dancing Up a Storm on the High Line

Minutes before the much-admired postmodern choreographer Trisha Brown was to stage her early 1973 “Roof Piece” on Thursday, June 9, the High Line’s urban park rangers and the stage managers of Trisha Brown’s Dance Company began to panic. An upstaging performance by a potentially show-stopping tornado struck fear upon headsets and walkie-talkies alike. Would the show go on?

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Post image for Friendly Balloons Invade the High Line

At the end of the newly opened Section 2 of the High Line is a psychedelic amusement park filled with inflatable creatures, googly-eyed, cartoony and basically irresistible. This playground, designed by artist collective Friends With You, was host to Aol’s party celebrating the High Line opening last Wednesday.

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Post image for A Tour of the High Line’s New Section 2

Section 2 of the High Line, an elevated railway running down Manhattan’s Tenth Avenue renovated by architectural firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro that has quickly become an urban design icon, opens to the public today. But visitors to the park yesterday were greeted with a soft-opening preview, complete with popsicle vendors, public art projects and plenty of opportunities to lounge in the grass. The new section may not cause as much stir as the launch of the first, but the 10-block stretch from 20th to 30th street is full of subtle surprises, from flyover walkways to hidden forests.

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Reactor

Required Reading

by Kyle Chayka on June 5, 2011

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This week’s Required Reading features mashed-up video games, a lost e.e. cummings poem, an indie arcade review and a museum just for you.

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Photo Essays

The High Line Park: Before & After

by Sam Horine on March 27, 2010

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I’m not sure exactly when I became aware of the High Line, but once you noticed it, it was hard to forget. There were giant graffiti pieces visible from street level and in the spring and summer you could see a ragged blaze of green sprouting from the otherwise lifeless tracks. I remember walking along Tenth and Eleventh Avenues — peering up at the hulking structure and wondering how I could get up there.

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