Internet Art

Post image for Updating Guerrilla Girls for Net Artists

Chiara Moioli is a 23-year-old artist based in Milan, Italy, and she thought it was time to update the Guerrilla Girls’ “The Advantages of Being a Woman Artist” for internet artists like herself.

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Post image for Whither Art? David Joselit’s Digital Art Problem

Is it still possible to imagine a book purporting to be about the circulation of images and art within the saturated global network that never mentions the existence of net art and digital art?

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Post image for Sometimes a GIF Is All You Need

Today and yesterday were glorious days in New York: August had come, the sun was shining, the weather was just right. They were the type of days that make you want to frolic, or skip or swing. And so it happened, when I clicked on a link in a tweet by pioneering net artist and critic Olia Lialina, that I saw her swinging joyfully towards me in my browser. This, I thought, is the perfect expression of summer.

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Post image for Brooklyn’s New Transfer Gallery Brings Internet Art Into Real Space

Internet art thrives in its native medium — over the past few years, there have been a significant number of online-only galleries, including Bubblebyte, Fach&Asendorf, and Klaus Gallery, that focused exclusively on showing the work of digital artists online. Physical spaces that make the necessary effort to turn internet art into compelling physical installations have been slower in coming. Thankfully, Brooklyn’s new Transfer Gallery is here to help solve that problem.

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Post image for Tell Me About Your Mother’s Tumblr

Editor’s note: This is the third in a series of commissioned essays for The World’s First Tumblr Art Symposium on Saturday, March 9, 2013.

I created my first internet artwork in 1993. At the time I was trying to have my work shown by various galleries but without success. The piece was titled “BKPC” (1993), or “Barbie and Ken Politically Correct.” It was a series of 12 photo-vignettes that told a story. This was before the World Wide Web and browsers. Most people accessed the internet via 1440 baud dial-up modems. I was a member of a computer BBS (bulletin board service), called thing bbs, which consisted mostly of text forums, although you could upload low-res GIFs that other members could download. I decided to present my artwork, one image a week with a short blurb, on the bbs.

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Essays

The Social Ties That Unbind

by An Xiao on February 25, 2013

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Editor’s note: This is the second in a series of commissioned essays for The World’s First Tumblr Art Symposium on Saturday, March 9, 2013.

When I sent my first email in the 1990s, the internet was just beginning to hit the mainstream. The idea that we would use the internet to talk to friends we knew offline had yet to take off. Most of the nascent social web culture, from usenet to telnet to AOL chat rooms, consisted of socializing largely with strangers. These strangers might eventually become friends, of course, but they’d start out as strangers in the purest sense of that word. At the outset, you didn’t even know their name, age, location, perhaps not even their gender.

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Essays

Revisiting Tumblr as Art

by Ben Valentine on February 22, 2013

Post image for Revisiting Tumblr as Art

Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of commissioned essay for The World’s First Tumblr Art Symposium. This essay is a revised and expanded version of Ben Valentine’s “Tumblr as Art” that was first published on June 19, 2012.

Much has been written about the rise of internet art. Just in the last few years, we’ve seen net artworks such as “intotime.org” by Rafaël Rozendaal; Twitter art by the likes of An Xiao and others; “e.m-bed.de/d/,” an immersive online music video experience by Yung Jake; and “$,” a Google Docs piece by Man Bartlett. But there is a burgeoning field of both social and discrete, beautiful, and weird internet art that demands our attention: Tumblr art.

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Post image for Kate Durbin Finds Virtual Moments of Adolescent Vulnerability in “Girls, Online”

Artist and writer Kate Durbin is both a scavenger and connoisseur of the Internet. She prowls the immaterial space, searching for images that express the emotional lives of adolescent girls. It was on Facebook that I first noticed a link to Durbin’s project “Girls, Online,” a collection of anonymous Tumblr posts from teenage girls that she assembled for Chris Higgs’s website Bright Stupid Confetti. Durbin captures the blogs and reblogs of sensitive adolescent teens and tweens, women-born-women, trans bois and gay boys. Her main focus, however, is on adolescent girls who are subject to the male gaze. The teenage girls she sees float about in that in-between space of clinging to girlhood and transforming into women.

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Reactor

This Click in Time

by Ben Valentine on September 17, 2012

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Jonas Lund’s new work “This Click in Time” is an internet art piece whose aesthetics relies on and is created by the viewer.

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Online

Collaging Street Views

by Ben Valentine on September 13, 2012

Post image for Collaging Street Views

Julien Levesque’s “Street Views Patchwork” is an interactive digital collage using layers of Google Street View to create exciting new landscapes.

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