multiculturalism

Post image for Emojis May Be Going Multiculti, but What About Art?

Here at Hyperallergic, we’ve discussed — and griped about — the limited menu of emoji on smartphones but now there’s word that Apple may expand the usual emoji suspects with more racial diversity to reflect a more inclusive reality. But can I suggest a few others?

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Instagram, Art, and Native American Narratives

by An Xiao on January 13, 2014

Post image for Instagram, Art, and Native American Narratives

On Twitter recently, #NotYourNarrative popped up, a series of hashtag statements largely from persons of color in the United States who wanted to challenge dominant media narratives.

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Jews in a Box

by Jillian Steinhauer on April 1, 2013

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As anyone who’s ever been expected to represent their entire religion/race/ethnicity/gender/world view knows, it’s a pretty difficult task. And yet this is what it seems random volunteers are being asked to do for an exhibition that opened at Berlin’s Jewish Museum a week and a half ago. The show, titled The Whole Truth … everything you always wanted to know about Jews, features a three-sided glass box with a bench inside, on which Jews will sit, one at a time, for the duration of the exhibition (through Sept. 1), answering visitors’ questions and responding to their comments.

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Post image for What Do You Do with White Nationalist Art Once the Irony’s Gone?

Charles Krafft’s artwork would be creepy no matter what. The artist makes porcelain ceramics in the traditions of Dutch Delftware and Italian maiolica pottery, but with a postmodern twist: the pieces are shaped like guns and grenades, or feature scenes of warfare and death (Disasterware), or portraits of Hitler and Charles Manson. There is a soap and cologne set called “Forgiveness,” which features swastikas. And Krafft creates china pieces — memorial and reliquaries, according to his site — using human cremains instead of calcinated cow bone.

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Post image for Recovering the History of the Puerto Rican Art Workers’ Coalition

A few times during her talk last week, historian and curator Yasmin Ramírez looked over at the copy of Art Workers: Radical Practice in the Vietnam War Era by Julia Bryan-Wilson sitting on the table in front of her. It wasn’t a look of love. Each time she referenced the book it was, at least in part, with a sense of frustration that despite being one of the only books devoted to the subject of the Art Workers’ Coalition (AWC), Bryan-Wilson largely left out the involvement of black and Puerto Rican artists, who played critical roles in the efforts of the group.

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Post image for Guggenheim Abu Dhabi Isn’t Going to be Eurocentric

The Financial Times has a short report on the partial unveiling of the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi collection at the Abu Dhabi art fair, including this interesting nugget about the non-Eurocentric focus of the collection.

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Piecing America Together

by Hrag Vartanian on November 8, 2012

Post image for Piecing America Together

While a minority of Americans are in a post-election meltdown over the browning of America, I feel compelled to admit that the part of America that is in a constant state of flux, always shifting, moving, changing, and accepting of the fact that the only things that unite Americans are a few ideas, is what I love about this place. To be American is to be dynamic, maybe even volatile, but never staid. Looking back, to borrow a Biblical allegory, is to turn into salt. I don’t think it’s an accident that the winning candidate’s slogan was “Forward” — that’s the direction we expect from America, even if we’re chronically disappointed. Sara Rahbar’s Flag series captures some of that desire to transform in a distinctly American way.

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Post image for Canada, the Country that Dare Not Speak Its Name

NORTH ADAMS, Massachusetts — Framed on the faux-log-cabin wall of Kent Monkman’s piece “Two Kindred Spirits” (which depicts the American western characters of Tonto and the Lone Ranger as lovers in a sort of Horatio/Hamlet life-sized diorama death scene) is a hand-embroidered phrase: “The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name.” This Oscar Wildean quotation also encapsulates the ever-nuanced Canada/U.S. relationship, and may give us a clue as to what’s really up with our neighbor to the north.

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Post image for The Kamikaze, The Temptress, The Manipulator, The Guru and Other Asian-American Stereotypes

Marvels & Monsters and Alt.Comics, the current tag team exhibition at Museum of Chinese in America, offers a one-two punch that unmasks the American comic book industry’s often conflicted relationship with Asians and Asian-Americans.

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Post image for A Billion Hits and Counting: Asian Americans and YouTube

Young Asian Americans dominate a great swath of the messy territory called YouTube, holding their own against the well-funded and famous. This fact makes two major points: there is a great pool of Asian Americans who, against the grain of “model minority” professionalism, need an outlet for humor and creative expression. Perhaps more importantly, these numbers prove the existence of a huge audience, largely Asian American, who want to see the experiences and talents of Asian people in popular media.

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