New York Studio School

Whitney Studio, a Landmark in Need of Repair, Designated

The New York Studio School’s Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village has been designated a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

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Post image for Apply for Full- and Part-Time Courses at the New York Studio School

New York Studio School is committed to giving a significant education to the aspiring artist that can last a lifetime.

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Post image for New York Studio School Summer Session 2014: Applications Due May 20

Applications for the New York Studio School’s Summer Session are due May 20.

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Galleries

The Shock and Awe of George Grosz

by Robert Cicetti on December 12, 2013

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George Grosz in Germany, on view at the New York Studio School Gallery, offers a rich overview of Grosz’s development as an artist and dissident.

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Post image for Reading in the Dark: Drawings from Australia

There’s something in the air about art and reading. In addition to Summer Reading at The Hole, the New York Studio School is presenting a show called Reading the Space: Contemporary Australian Drawing 4.

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Post image for A Small Oasis of Abstraction: Ying Li and Eve Aschheim

It’s the dog days of summer in New York, and may we suggest some respite from the sizzling heat with an exhibition of two abstract painters, Ying Li and Eve Aschheim, at the New York Studio School.

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Post image for The Hand of the Humanist: Leo Steinberg’s Drawings at New York Studio School

Leo Steinberg (1920–2011) was the rare scholar with the ability to alter the way we think about art, history and culture, and, inferentially, the things we create.

“The Eye Is a Part of the Mind” is the title of an essay first published in 1953 in Partisan Review and later in Steinberg’s landmark collection, Other Criteria: Confrontations with Twentieth-Century Art (Oxford, 1972).

In the essay, Steinberg seeks to “show that representation is a central esthetic function in all art; and that the formalist esthetic, designed to champion the new abstract trend, was largely based on a misunderstanding and an underestimation of the art it set out to defend.”

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Post image for Failing Better: William Kentridge’s Drawing Lessons

William Kentridge was a failure. By his own account, the South African artist racked up a long list of impressive defeats before succeeding as a draftsman and animator. Before the opening of his current retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art Kentridge gave a lecture on “Drawing Lessons” at the New York Studio School.

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