painting

Post image for Critical Americana in Chicago

CHICAGO — In a group show at Packer Schopf Gallery, three artists explore ideas or activities that are central to American identity: nature, political protest, and sports.

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Post image for “Wow. George Bush Is a Painter”

“Wow. George Bush is a painter,” former president George W. Bush told NBC Today interviewers regarding the reception he imagines his paintings of world leaders will receive upon their public release tomorrow.

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Post image for The Line Is a Circle: Painting at the Threshold

I was born in 1983. Just shy of my 31st birthday, it occurred to me that somewhere after 1984 — virtually my entire lifetime — painting disappears almost entirely from most books on contemporary art history.

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Post image for The Persuasive Paintings of a Shamanistic Yenta

SOMERVILLE, Mass. — The idea that a work may be finished before some mysterious visual and artistic calculus is complete tends toward the blasphemous. And, with a shrug of the shoulders, to simply imply that you are finished with a painting or drawing when you don’t want to work on it anymore — well, that’s just how Amy Sillman rolls …

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Post image for Painting Beyond Belief: Amy Sillman, Peter Doig, and Jordan Kantor Discuss Chagall

Last Sunday night, on the occasion of the exhibit Chagall: Love, War, and Exile on view at the Jewish Museum, Jordan Kantor a painter and professor at California College of the Arts, hosted an intimate panel looking back at painting since the death of Chagall to the present.

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GalleriesWeekend

Simon Hantaï’s Discontent

by Gwenaël Kerlidou on September 7, 2013

Post image for Simon Hantaï’s Discontent

In 1983, at the height of his career, Simon Hantaï (1922–2008), then sixty years old, decided to withdraw from the art scene and stop exhibiting his work, if not to stop painting altogether. He would not show again until 1998, a fifteen-year hiatus and self-imposed silence that echo with more force as time goes by. Why, we may wonder, would an artist at the top of his game, especially someone of Hantaï’s stature, do such a thing?

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Post image for Some Thoughts on Clement Greenberg and His Legacy

In his introductory essay to Vitamin P, a survey of contemporary painting first published by Phaidon in 2002, the poet and critic Barry Schwabsky takes pains to point out the variety of stylistic positions available to a contemporary painter. In doing so, Schwabsky suggests that there is no single identifying characteristic that would disqualify a contemporary painting from critical consideration today. This state of openness was not always the case. In my opinion, however, the receptivity that Schwabsky claims for painting is not actually an accurate characterization of the current situation, where success is generally judged by an artist’s standing in the marketplace.

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Post image for Teaching a Robot to Paint

We’re fascinated with robots doing human things, from Elektro chain-smoking its way through the 1939 World’s Fair to the Turk automaton that was beating people at chess during the 18th and 19th centuries (there turned out to be a human hiding inside the latter, but still). Now a team at the University of Konstanz in Germany has trained a robot to paint.

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Post image for More Vibrant Tales of Obsolete Pigments

After our first installment of obsolete pigments, we had such a strong response that we realized we’d only hit the tip of the curious history of vanished colors.

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Post image for The Colorful Stories of 5 Obsolete Art Pigments

The colors of art change not just with trends, but availability as well. For reasons of being incredibly poisonous, expensive, or just involving way too many snails, here are five pigments that have disappeared from art.

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