poetry

BooksWeekend

Nicolas Hundley’s Heretical Machinery

by John Yau on May 29, 2016

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Nicolas Hundley is a poet of pronouns. In many of his poems and prose poems, a pronoun ­– he, they, you, and we – is central to each line or sentence.

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BooksWeekend

Piercing Clarity: Gail Mazur’s Poetry

by John Yau on May 8, 2016

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Aptly titled, Forbidden City is Gail Mazur’s seventh book of poetry. Before getting the book — which she sent me — I knew that Gail had written the poems in the years after her husband, Michael Mazur (1935–2009), had died of congestive heart failure.

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Post image for The Poetic Verse of Our Collective Google Queries

Type a search into Google and the most popular terms start auto-populating below, suggesting the collective desires, queries, and curiosities of internet users.

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BooksWeekend

Beguiling Simplicity: The Poetry of Robert Lax

by Louis Bury on April 16, 2016

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Lifelong friend of Trappist Monk Thomas Merton and abstract painter Ad Reinhardt, Robert Lax wrote spare poems that, in their beguiling simplicity, provoke anxieties about how and why we read.

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Post image for Antithetical Poetics: Recent Books by Joseph Donahue

Among contemporary American poets, Joseph Donahue is an underrecognized master. For years, he has been accumulating a prodigious body of work in which a searching vision and a refinement of craftsmanship combine.

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Film

The Ritualized Anger of a Queer Poet

by Emma Eisenberg on March 23, 2016

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In The Book of Conrad, a documentary profiling the life and creative practice of poet CAConrad, we see anger anew: as the impulse behind living, behind ritual, even behind prayer.

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Post image for On the Outside Looking In: Mardsen Hartley’s Poetry

Marsden Hartley represents a rather contradictory figure in American art and literature. Both poet and painter—he wrote poetry during the mornings throughout most of his life and painted in the afternoons—he survived through the latter, but actively sought out literary attention and wrote about literature as a “business.”

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Post image for A Show of Love for John Giorno’s Poetry, Art, and Life

PARIS — Kudos to Ugo Rondinone.

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BooksWeekend

Keep Looking: Rebecca Wolff’s ‘One Morning—.’

by Jon Curley on December 19, 2015

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So serene an entry point into this volume, the title One Morning—. promises the lengthening of sunlight across the expanse of a modest domestic existence, incidents without excitement.

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Post image for Vision, Music, and the Scepter: Ben Mazer’s ‘The Glass Piano’

Ben Mazer may best be considered a poet for poets; his work a fortress against the common reader.

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