Renaissance art

Post image for Remixing the Renaissance as GIFs

By now it’s become a familiar trope: Photoshop or GIF something historical, say, Old Masters or old photographs. But just because it’s been done doesn’t mean it’s been done best. And the elaborate GIFs that James Kerr makes from early Northern Renaissance paintings are a hilariously new take on the idea of remixing antique art.

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Post image for Renaissance Art of the End Times Revealed in Rediscovered Apocalyptic Book

In 1533, hundreds of dragons were reported to darken the skies over Bohemia, following a 1506 sighting of a blinding bright comet slicing over the sky. Were these foreboding occurrences signs of the apocalypse, or just a lot of Renaissance hearsay?

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Post image for Exposing the Secrets, Scandals, and Art of the Italian Renaissance

A time dominated by the likes of Raphael, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, and Botticelli, the Italian Renaissance was a stunning period for art. A new website from Oxford University Press’s Grove Art Online and the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC gives an introduction to this world.

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Post image for First Western Painting of Native Americans Discovered at the Vatican

During the recent restoration of Pinturicchio’s Resurrection fresco (1494) on the wall of the Hall of Mysteries in the Borgia Apartment at the Vatican has revealed what may be the first images of Native Americans in European art.

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Post image for The Secret Life of Paintings

Last weekend in a Doylestown, Pennsylvania—which boasts not one but two locally owned, well-stocked bookstores—I picked up an old Phaidon edition of Jacob Burckhardt’s The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy for ten bucks.

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Post image for The Latest in Italian Renaissance Art News and Gossip

What would the Renaissance be without its mysteries and tantalizing gossip? In the spirit of Georgio Vasari’s original Renaissance tabloid, The Lives of the Artist, we’ve compiled a list of the latest controversies, headlines and other voci (rumors), as the Italians say, in Renaissance art.

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