Robert Smithson

Post image for Robert Smithson’s Sacred and Profane Pop

Pop, an exhibition currently on view at James Cohan’s new Grand Street location, explores a more obscure phase of Robert Smithson’s tragically brief career: his figurative engagement with popular culture.

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Post image for A Documentary Mines the Stories of Three Pioneers of Land Art

In his new documentary, Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art, filmmaker and art historian James Crump digs beneath the surface to explore the personal lives, artworks, and historical treatment of three land artists: Michael Heizer, Walter De Maria, and Robert Smithson.

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Post image for Seeing Glass Boxes and Shards at Dia:Beacon

At Dia:Beacon there is an installation by Fred Sandback, a series of giant shapes formed from brightly colored string.

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Post image for How the Space Race Altered Art in the Americas

Space exploration and the science fiction imagination of alien encounters out in the stars reached their peak of optimistic possibility between the 1940s and 1970s, culminating with the first moon landing in 1969.

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Post image for The 1969 Lunar Landing: One Giant Leap for Art

On July 20, 1969, the world watched, and was transfixed, as American astronaut Neil Armstrong — rendered on television as a ghostly black-and-white figure — descended from the Lunar Module onto the surface of the moon.

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Post image for The Mythic Scale of History and Labor at Spiral Jetty

ROZEL POINT, Utah — Beginning with childhood visits to the American Museum of Natural History and continuing with excursions to study rock formations throughout his adult life, Robert Smithson cultivated a lifelong obsession with natural (and human) history that explicitly informed his artwork, including the Spiral Jetty, his most well-known piece.

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Post image for From Calder to Kruger, the New Whitney Museum’s First Show

The inaugural exhibition at the new Whitney Museum is not perfect, but it is pretty damn good.

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Post image for A Painter’s Reflective (and Reflected) Photographic Portraits

PARIS — The use of mirrors in art has been a rich one, used by Pop, Kinetic, Minimal, and Conceptual artists. In this long tradition, the Jeu de Paume currently offers an additional point of reference.

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Post image for A Google Earth Perspective on Land Art

Earlier today @museumnerd tweeted out a link to a view of Michael Heizer’s land work “Double Negative” (1969) in Google Maps. Viewed in satellite, from high above, Heizer’s 1,500-foot-long trenches looks almost incidental, like cuts made with scissors into the skin of the earth.

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Post image for A Summer Pilgrimage to Nevada’s Double Negative

Michael Heizer’s “Double Negative” (1969), located two hours northeast of Las Vegas, is a quintessential piece of the Land Art canon. Yet if you don’t have a clear image of what you’re looking for, you may not find it — this is no “Spiral Jetty.”

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