Tracey Emin

Galleries

Quickening the Pulse in Miami

by Mostafa Heddaya on December 11, 2013

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MIAMI BEACH — Parsing contemporary art’s inscrutable pecking order of markets and sensibilities is already a miserable endeavor, but the stakes inch ever higher in Miami, where the tantalizing gruel of celebrity gets spread preciously thin.

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Post image for First US Museum Exhibition for Tracey Emin Opens at MOCA, North Miami

The Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (MOCA) present Tracey Emin: Angel without You, the first American museum exhibition dedicated to the acclaimed British artist. On view December 4, 2013, through March 9, 2014, the exhibition is the first to focus on Emin’s use of neon, a medium that has played an essential role in the development of her practice.

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Post image for Five Artists We Don’t Want to Be Our Valentine

Sometimes it’s better to be alone. Here are a few artists who we wouldn’t particularly like to spend a romantic Valentine’s Day with, from the over-sharing to the unstable to the plain unsettling.

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Post image for Tracey Emin to Attend Tomorrow’s Midnight Showing of her Times Square Installation

On Valentine’s Eve (is that a thing?), Tracey Emin will watch her video piece “I Promise to Love You,” along with the thousands of people that constantly circulate Times Square, as its neon pledges of love scrawl in wavering neon over 15 of Times Square’s giant screens.

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Post image for Art and the 40th Anniversary of Roe v. Wade

On January 22, 1973 the US Supreme Court legalized abortion in a 7–2 ruling in the case of Roe v. Wade. It’s been forty years since that decision, and although abortion remains legal, it’s no less controversial. In fact, it might be moreso these days, if the growing number of restrictions on the procedure throughout the country is any indication.

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Post image for Why Doesn’t the UK Want Charles Saatchi’s Art Collection?

Well, here’s a conundrum you don’t face everyday: famed art collector Charles Saatchi wants to donate his collection of contemporary work to his home country, the UK, but they don’t seem to want it. (First-world problems!)

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Reactor

Required Reading

by Hrag Vartanian on December 18, 2011

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This week, new Banksy, artists/writers design money, early Christian art, talking to Gabriel Orozco, catalogue raisonnés, modern art toilets, globalizing art history, design criticism and political photo trends.

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Museums

A Collector’s Passion for All Things British

by Ana Alvarez on September 27, 2011

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PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND — Ever since Pollock splattered his ego onto a canvas in the 1950s, a decided geographical shift across the Atlantic occurred — Europe lost its ruling power as center of the art world and New York stepped into it shoes as the new authoritative hub of contemporary art. Yet, the new exhibition at The Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design, Made in the UK: Contemporary Art from the Richard Brown Baker Collection reminds that there was some pretty fantastic art being made just on the other side of the Atlantic. The exhibition displays work by British artist from the past 60 years, including exemplary works of Britain’s contributions to decidedly international art movements like Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Op Art.

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Reactor

Required Reading

by Hrag Vartanian on August 21, 2011

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This week’s Required Reading includes Tracey Emin’s gift to 10 Downing St, you too can levitate in photos, Koons as roadkill, Nike’s swoosh is 40, internet art bubble, evolution of the hipster, autobot aethetics, street art in East Timor & more.

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Post image for A Connected White Hedonist’s Guide to Young British Art

A Hedonist’s Guide to Art may as well be called A Hedonist’s Guide to the Art World. Released last winter, the book is a collaboration between Artica, an eGallery for contemporary art, and Hg2, a series of luxury travel guides. It’s comprised of short essays from about 60 people from various reaches of the upper echelons of the London art world. The essays are divided between five chapter headings — ideas, lifestyle, the market, the art itself and “inner workings.” The content is most often in the form of a personal anecdote. That said, these tidbits are best nibbled on in small doses — it’s slow-going to read very many of these essays all at once.

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