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Sesame Street Explains Sculpture

by Kyle Chayka on April 18, 2013

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It takes a lot of work to carve a sculpture, but apparently muppets have all the strength it takes. On the April 18 episode of Sesame Street, “sculpture” was the word of the day and the little red fuzzball Elmo teamed up with chiseled Mad Men star Jon Hamm to give viewers a quick history of the medium, from Rodin to David Smith.

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Post image for Yoko Ono Offers Impossible Make-Up Tips for Men

Yoko Ono is usually a bit much for me: I find things like smile apps and instruction pieces that tell you to “Make a wish” and “Keep wishing” cloyingly precious. (Maybe I’m just a cranky, cynical New Yorker.) But Ono has a new video called “Make-Up Tips for Men” (made as part of her clothing line for Opening Ceremony) that I actually adore, precisely because it cuts the sweetness with camp.

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Post image for MoMA Curator Paola Antonelli Appears on Colbert Report to Talk Design

How well designed is your coffee mug? Our personal design heroine and all-time curator crush Paola Antonelli appeared on the Colbert Report last night to critique all those everyday objects we take for granted in advance of her next big show at the Museum of Modern Art.

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Post image for Hilarious Portlandia Episode Shows the Dangers of Conceptual Art

For those uninitiated into its history, conceptual art can often seem like a trick — is that really a urinal in an art gallery? Is sticking yogurt caps on gallery walls really great art? Unfortunately for Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein, the stars and creators of the sketch TV show Portlandia, it turns out that conceptual art can actually trap you, even outside of a gallery opening.

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Post image for Steve McQueen at the Art Institute of Chicago or How To Install Moving Images

At the Art Institute of Chicago’s Steve McQueen exhibition, I saw something unusual: museum-goers spending time — minutes of it! — watching moving images. In an otherwise bustling museum, the visitors in these rooms were silent and enthralled.

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Post image for Watch Jean Cocteau’s Nightmarish First Feature Film

Inveterate surrealist and playwright, artist, and writer polymath Jean Cocteau said that his first film, The Blood of a Poet (1929), wasn’t a work of surrealism — he wanted to “avoid the deliberate manifestations of the unconscious.” But, I have to say, it’s pretty surreal.

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VIDEO: Ai Weiwei Goes Gangnam Style

by Kyle Chayka on October 24, 2012

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With this one, the title pretty much says it all. Ai Weiwei’s entire studio has participated in a remake of South Korean rapper PSY’s epic global pop hit “Gangnam Style.”

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Bob and Roberta Smith

Grayson Perry is a cross-dressing British ceramic artist. Bob and Roberta Smith is a single artist who goes by a double name that also functions as an inside joke. Two of the weirder personalities in the contemporary art world, they come together in this video, in which a small sculpture of a dog proudly proclaims, “Conceptual art is shit.”

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Post image for William Eggleston Comes Back to New Orleans (Prospect 2 Spotlight)

NEW ORLEANS – Prospect 2 isn’t just about the new or the conceptual or the overwrought: William Eggleston brings a pair of several decades-old works to his Prospect installation at the Old US Mint on the edge of the French Quarter, and together they offer the most satisfying viewing experience of anything I’ve seen so far in this edition of the biennial.

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Post image for Anthony Goicolea’s Slowly Approaching Apocalypse

The vibe of Anthony Goicolea’s first traveling museum solo show is a slow melancholy. Looking at the photos, videos, paintings and installation in Alter-Ego: A Decade of Work by Anthony Goicolea at the Telfair Museum in Savannah, Georgia made me sink slowly into thoughts of living with apocalypse. Goicolea’s work envisions apocalypse not as an abrupt event followed by an aftermath, but as a slow and definitive ruin that continues throughout life.

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