YouTube

Post image for Actors Re-Create YouTube Comment Wars

With notable exceptions, I tend to think of most internet comment sections as a kind of hell. In that scheme, YouTube comments would comprise their own circle. But, really, why get angry or upset about YouTube comments when you could simply laugh?

Continue Reading →
Post image for EXCLUSIVE: Meet Artists from Creative Growth Center on Pharrell’s YouTube Channel

If you’re an art-loving person, there’s a good chance you’ve seen work by artists from the Creative Growth Center. Their art has been shown in galleries and museums worldwide; you might, for instance, have strolled past some of it at last fall’s Rosemarie Trockel retrospective at the New Museum. But you might not know just what the Creative Growth Center is, or what it does, or who the artists are.

Continue Reading →
Still from

Does Wendy Vainity actually know what she’s doing? The 48-year-old native of Adelaide, Australia is one of the weirdest YouTube users I’ve ever come across, with a collection of homemade 3D animations that range from the surreal to the creepy to the outright bizarre and disturbing.

Continue Reading →
Post image for A Billion Hits and Counting: Asian Americans and YouTube

Young Asian Americans dominate a great swath of the messy territory called YouTube, holding their own against the well-funded and famous. This fact makes two major points: there is a great pool of Asian Americans who, against the grain of “model minority” professionalism, need an outlet for humor and creative expression. Perhaps more importantly, these numbers prove the existence of a huge audience, largely Asian American, who want to see the experiences and talents of Asian people in popular media.

Continue Reading →

Reactor

YouTube Users Visualized

by An Xiao on June 11, 2012

Post image for YouTube Users Visualized

There are two entertaining things about watching YouTube videos. The first is the video itself, whether that be a cat playing a keyboard or a musician singing a new tune. The second is the comments and the amazing amount of likes, dislikes and random jabber that appear, especially beneath the most popular videos.

Continue Reading →
Post image for The Problem with Hennessy Youngman

Jayson Musson is a very popular man in the art world. His YouTube account has over 900,000 views, and his fans are rabid. The funny thing is, though, most of his fans probably have no idea who he is. Here’s the answer: Jayson Musson is the artist behind Hennessy Youngman.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Did the Internet Make Fashion More Accessible?

High fashion used to be the terrain of the elite and fashion shows once welcomed only editors, buyers and VIPs but the internet has changed all that.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Is the Internet the Death of Performance Art?

Did video kill the performance art star? The New York Times asks this question in an article that claims that the constant spectacle of YouTube and social media have trumped performance art’s shock value.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Censored Smithsonian Video Flagged “Inappropriate” on YouTube

Hyperallergic tweep @remaerdyaD pointed out that David Wojnarowicz’ video, recently removed from the National Portrait Gallery’s Hide/Seek exhibition, has also been flagged as “inappropriate for some users” on YouTube, meaning that viewers will have to sign in to the website and check their safety settings before being able to watch the video.

Since there’s nothing explicitly offensive in the video, I have to guess that YouTube’s decision to wall off the video was carried out in the aftermath of the conflict at the Smithsonian over religious imagery in Wojnarowicz’ work.

Continue Reading →

Articles

YouTube Archive + Anarchy, Part 1

by Brent Burket on November 18, 2010

Post image for YouTube Archive + Anarchy, Part 1

For a fan of art like me, YouTube is a gold mine. I remember when I was in college about the only access I had to the art and music scene in New York City was pouring over the New York Times in the library. The rest was imagination. YouTube brings art and music closer, no matter where you are or when you are. It’s a crazy archive that holds art, new and old. Sometimes its been sanctioned by the artist. Sometimes, not so much. The best thing about art on YouTube is the access that it allows for the viewer and also because of the exposure for artists. Some artists and gallerists might have an issue with that last point. But quite frankly, that’s their problem. Click through for a journey into YouTube’s anarchic archive of art and artistic materials.

Continue Reading →