Weekend


Spearheaded by John Yau, Thomas Micchelli, Albert Mobilio and Natalie Haddad

Post image for Cosmic Wind: Yoshimasu Gozo’s ‘Alice Iris Red Horse’

In 2003 I received an invitation to attend a reading by the poet Yoshimasu Gozo, someone I had never heard of. I asked around, and was told that Gozo was an avant-garde poet who read in a bygone oracular style.

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Post image for Roger Ricco, Artist, Has Something to Show You

Roger Ricco is an artist. He is also a steel-foundry worker’s son, a former rock-band promoter, and a co-founder and co-director, with Frank Maresca, of Ricco/Maresca, a well-known New York venue specializing in contemporary art by both schooled and self-taught artists

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ReactorWeekend

Required Reading

by Hrag Vartanian on August 14, 2016

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This week, why we need art, art students today, office design in Tokyo, meth in North Korea, a 17th-century Turkish travel writer, writing the other, and more.

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ReactorWeekend

Weekend Words: Withdraw

by Weekend Editors on August 14, 2016

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“When the mind withdraws into itself and dispenses with facts it makes only chaos.”

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Post image for Reader’s Diary: Darryl Pinckney’s ‘Black Deutschland’

This is not so much a second novel as a mature reimagining of what a youthful first novel might have been.

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MuseumsWeekend

Is It Possible to See What Is There?

by John Yau on August 14, 2016

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The legendary curator Dorothy Miller first obtained a Richard Hunt sculpture for the Museum of Modern Art in 1957.

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MuseumsWeekend

Under No Obligation

by John Yau on August 14, 2016

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We should all be inspired by Alma Thomas’s optimism.

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Post image for In Houston, an Outsider Art Trove Finds a Museum Home

HOUSTON, Texas — In this long, hot summer of violence, election-campaign anxiety, and widespread malaise, seekers of relief might find solace in music, movies or visits to museums — that is, in art in general, not so much for escapism, but for art’s reassuring messages about the endurance of the human spirit in the face of adversity.

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Post image for Hunger and Thirst: Chantal Akerman’s ‘Je tu il elle’

Chantal Akerman’s death by suicide in October 2015, led me to revisit many of her films and to watch new ones, among them Je tu il elle of 1975.

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MuseumsWeekend

The Enabler

by Thomas Micchelli on August 13, 2016

John D. Graham,

If measured as a flame to kindling, John D. Graham was arguably the most consequential figure in 20th-century American art.

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