Weekend


Spearheaded by John Yau, Thomas Micchelli, and Albert Mobilio

Gary Wragg,

In 1978, the esteemed British curator Bryan Robertson saw fit to compare the promise of painter Gary Wragg’s emergent career with that of the young Jackson Pollock. It is a comparison lent some weight by the fact that Robertson had written a monograph and organized a major exhibition devoted to Pollock’s work when he was Director of London’s Whitechapel Gallery.

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Installation view, 'Amy Sillman: one lump or two'

Considering that I had always thought of Amy Sillman as an abstract painter, I was surprised to encounter, after seeing her mid-career retrospective at the Hessel Museum of Bard College, an oeuvre that was entirely about the body, touch, and the awkwardness of human interaction.

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Mary Heilmann,

For his solo show at Pace Gallery in 2010, Thomas Nozkowski made the decision to hang his work in pairs, with an oil painting on canvas board or panel alongside a related work on paper, setting up a contrast between density and light, slow and fast, rumination and riff. This comparison came to mind repeatedly while wandering through Paintings on Paper, the effervescent summer exhibition at David Zwirner.

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ReactorWeekend

Required Reading

by Hrag Vartanian on August 3, 2014

Post image for Required Reading

This week, auction houses stalking new buyers, Frick Museum controversies, objections to Norman Rockwell’s new biography, the impact of deskilling on arts education, should musicians play Tel Aviv, and more?

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ReactorWeekend

Weekend Words: Guide

by Weekend Editors on August 3, 2014

Leonardo da Vinci,

A grim chapter of history came to a close on Monday with the death of the last surviving crew member of the Enola Gay, a little more than a week before the 69th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima.

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Bruce Kurland,

Ever since viewing what turned out to be the final solo show of Bruce Kurland (1938-2013), at the Victoria Munroe Gallery in New York City in 1990, I have been haunted by his intimate oil paintings.

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Eric Baus,

The Tranquilized Tongue (City Lights Books, 2014), Eric Baus’s fourth book, is his best yet. It consists of more than sixty compact prose poems, some of which are only one sentence long, and with none as long as the first one, “The Illuminated Egg,” a single block of ten sentences.

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Catherine Murphy,

When I arrived at Catherine Murphy’s home in Poughkeepsie, New York, I was led down a long outdoor path to her studio. Murphy was working on a painting of a pie crust; she asked her assistant to put the dough on ice while she spoke with me.

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Arthur Sze,

I have a habit, when reading a good book of poetry, of looking for the places where the poet seems to be reflecting on his or her own sense of what poetry is. Arthur Sze, one of my favorite poets, writes, “If I sprinkle iron filings onto a sheet / / of paper, I make visible the magnetic lines / of the moment.”

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It seems a little unfair to encumber an exhibition with a title like OK Great REALLY this is ALSO RIDICULOUS. With its overtones of exasperation and disparagement, the phrase sends confusing signals about what’s in store and how seriously to take it. But the show hooks you in an instant and holds you for a good, long time.

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