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Art Movements

This week in art news: the US National Trust for Historic Preservation released its list of endangered historic places, Greece’s prime minister requested that Britain return the Parthenon marbles, and the New-York Historical Society launched a program on civil rights history.

Charles Gustrine, “
True Sons of Freedom” (1918), the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History (courtesy New-York Historical Society Museum & Library)

Art Movements is a weekly collection of news, developments, and stirrings in the art world. Subscribe to receive these posts as a weekly newsletter.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation published its 2018 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places.

Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras told press officials that he had requested the repatriation of the Parthenon Marbles during his first meeting with UK prime minister Theresa May. The subject is not mentioned at all in the UK government’s official press release regarding the meeting.

The New-York Historical Society announced an initiative to dedicate renovated and rotating gallery space “to the topics of freedom, equality, and civil rights in America.” The initiative’s inaugural exhibition, Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow, will open on September 7.

Salvator Mundi” (ca 1500) will go on display at the Louvre Abu Dhabi on September 18.

Banksy unveiled a number of new stencil works in Paris.

Sophie Chadwick, the youngest daughter of Sculptor Lynn Chadwick (1914–2003), launched a lawsuit challenging the estate’s ownership of hundreds of her father’s works.

Alexander Khochinsky filed a lawsuit for compensation and damages against Poland, alleging that the country’s government attempted to extradite him after he reported his possession of Antoine Pesne’s 1754 painting “Girl with Dove” to the Wielkopolskie Museum.

Van Shields announced his retirement as executive director of the Berkshire Museum. The news comes just days after the museum earmarked a further nine artworks for deaccession, including paintings by Albert Bierstadt, Thomas Moran, and Benjamin West.

Albert Bierstadt, “Giant Redwood Trees of California” (1874) (courtesy Sotheby’s)

A Keith Haring mural in Amsterdam was re-exposed to the public after being covered up by insulation panels for 29 years.

A local teacher’s restoration of a 16th-century polychromed equestrian statue of Saint George in the Spanish town of Estella was likened to a children’s toy and Tintin on social media.

Potter Tom Edwards accused Elon Musk of commercially exploiting his image of a farting unicorn without permission.

Median home values in Beacon, New York, rose 25% within a year of Dia: Beacon‘s opening in 2003, according to a feature by Curbed.

David Zwirner launched a podcast titled Dialogues. The first episode is a conversation between Jeff Koons and Luke Syson, the chairman of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Transactions

Amy Sherald, “Planes, rockets, and the spaces in between” (2018), the Baltimore Museum of Art, purchase by exchange with funds provided by the Pearlstone Family Fund and through a partial gift of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. (courtesy the Baltimore Museum of Art)

The Baltimore Museum of Art announced the acquisition of 23 works, including seven pieces acquired with funds from recently deaccessioned artworks. This and other notable sales and acquisitions are chronicled in our latest Transactions story.

Transitions

Actor Emmanuelle Seigner was invited to join the awards body for the Oscars, weeks after the organization expelled her husband, film director Roman Polanski.

Jennifer Y. Chi stepped down as deputy director and chief curator of the Brooklyn Museum.

Carol Black was appointed chair of the British Library.

Tania Coen-Uzzielli was appointed director of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.

Eva Yaa Asantewaa was appointed director of Gibney.

Jessica Porter was appointed director of ArtTable.

Robin Held was appointed executive director of Washington State University’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art.

Trevor Schoonmaker was appointed deputy director of Duke University’s Nasher Museum of Art.

The Museum Folkwang in Essen appointed Nadine Engel as head of its 19th and 20th century art collection, and Thomas Seelig as head of the museum’s photographic collection.

Emily Potter-Ndiaye was appointed head of education and curator of academic programs at the Mead Art Museum at Amherst College.

The Rhode Island School of Design elected Ilene Chaiken, Caroline Baumann, and Sheikha Al Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani to its board of trustees.

Edward Rada joined the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts’ board of directors.

The Mori Building Digital Art Museum opened in Tokyo.

The Copenhagen Contemporary, a refurbished shipyard dedicated to contemporary exhibitions, opened to the public.

The Bauhaus Museum Dessau is scheduled to open on September 8, 2019.

The Art Dealers Association of America added five new member galleries: Honor Fraser Gallery, Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Jessica Silverman Gallery, Franklin Parrasch Gallery, and Venus Over Manhattan.

The Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI) achieved LEED Gold certification [via email announcement].

Cheim & Read gallery announced that it will move to a new space in uptown Manhattan in January and will “transition […] to a private practice.”

ArtPrize shifted to a biennial schedule.

The Whitney Museum of American Art will be open for 7 days a week throughout July and August.

Accolades

Mehdi Moutashar, “Deux carrés dont un encadré” (“Two squares, one of them framed,” 2017), wood, paint, elastic wire, collection of the artist (photo © Fabrice Leroux)

The Victoria & Albert Museum announced Mehdi Moutashar and Marina Tabassum as the joint recipients of Jameel Prize 5.

The National Endowment for the Arts announced its 2018 National Heritage Fellows.

The jury for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, National Native American Veterans Memorial, selected Harvey Pratt‘s (Cheyenne/Arapaho) design titled, “Warriors’ Circle of Honor.”

The Mary S. Byrd Gallery of Art at Augusta University became the third recipient of the Ellsworth Kelly Award.

The Canadian Photography Institute announced its 2018 research fellows.

The shortlist for the 2018 Jarman Award was announced.

The Association pour la Diffusion Internationale de l’Art Français (ADIAF) announced the nominees of the 2018 Marcel Duchamp Prize.

Opportunities

Shandaken Projects and The Trust for Governors Island announced the launch of a new residency program named Shandaken: Governors Island. Applications are open through July 30, 2018.

Obituaries

Sabina Ott, “come near come nearly” (detail) (2014), mirror, styrofoam, plastic, spray foam and enamel, canvas, graphite and watercolor, 60 x 50 x 10 in (courtesy the artist, the artists’ estate, and Aspect/Ratio Gallery)

Nina Baym (1936–2018), literary scholar and critic.

Christopher Darling (unconfirmed–2018), illustrator.

James Gips (1946–2018), technologist and academic. Pioneered the use of computer technology for people with disabilities.

David Goldblatt (1930–2018), photographer.

Donald Hall (1928–2018), poet.

Frank Heart (1929–2018), engineer. Oversaw the development of the first routing computer for the ARPANET.

Martin Hunt (1942–2018), designer.

Dan Ingram (1934–2018), disc jockey.

Joe Jackson (1928–2018), talent manager. Jackson family patriarch.

Daisy Kadibil (1923–2018), member of the Stolen Generations. Renowned for her trip alongside Australia’s Rabbit Proof Fence.

Diana King (1927–2018), teacher. Created education programs for students with dyslexia.

Dick Leitsch (1935–2018), gay rights activist. Led the “sip-in” at Julius‘ Bar.

Sabina Ott (1955–2018), artist and educator.

Rebecca Parris (1951–2018), jazz singer.

Vinnie Paul (1964–2018), drummer, songwriter, and founder of Pantera.

Willie Lee Rose (1927–2018), historian of the Reconstruction era.

David Spiller (1942–2018), artist.

Kevin Wolff (1955–2018), artist and teacher.

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