Events

The Rise of the Queer Press After Stonewall

Next week at the New York Public Library, founding members of the Gay Liberation Front will discuss the rise of the queer press in the 1960s and ’70s and how it continues to make an impact today.

Martha Shelley sells Gay Liberation Front paper during Weinstein Hall demonstration (1970 (photo by Diana Davies, all images courtesy New York Public Library, Manuscripts and Archives Division)
Martha Shelley sells Gay Liberation Front paper during Weinstein Hall demonstration (1970 (photo by Diana Davies, all images courtesy New York Public Library, Manuscripts and Archives Division)

After the Stonewall Riots, the Gay Liberation Front was founded as an activist organization building on the same ideas and and politics that came out of Stonewall. The group published its own newspaper, Come Out!, which was the first gay liberation newspaper in the world. Next week at the New York Public Library (NYPL), founding members of the Gay Liberation Front, as well as activists, scholars, and media personalities, will come together to discuss the rise of the queer press in the 1960s and ’70s and how it continues to make an impact today.

Gay Liberation Front marches on Times Square, New York (1970) (photo by Diana Davies)
Gay Liberation Front marches on Times Square, New York (1970) (photo by Diana Davies)

Hosted in conjunction with the NYPL exhibition Love & Resistance: Stonewall 50, the event, titled “Past and Future of the Queer Press,” brings together Perry Brass and Karla Jay, two of the Gay Liberation Front’s founding members, media and activism scholar Michael Bronskim and Kathy Tu and Tobin Low, co-hosts of Nancy, a podcast by WNYC Studios.

The event is free and open to the public, though priority is given to those who register in advance. A stand-by line will also form one hour before the event. More information, as well as a link to register, can be found here.

When: Tuesday, May 21, 6:30 pm
Where: Wachenheim Trustees Room, The New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, 42nd Street & Fifth Avenue, Midtown, Manhattan

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