News

Week in Review: Forensic Architecture Investigates Police Violence, Golden Toilet Stolen

Also, researchers think your opinion of a Sam Gilliam study can reveal your opinion of Trump, Climate Week approaches in New York, and more.

A rendering of Harith Augustus’s fatal altercation with police officers(all images courtesy Forensic Architecture)

Week in Review is a weekly collection of news, developments, and stirrings in the art world. Subscribe to receive these posts as a weekly newsletter.

Research by Forensic Architecture suggests injustice in the police killing of Harith Augustus. Forensic Architecture has partnered with Chicago’s Invisible Institute to mount a counter-investigation into the official police narrative surrounding the death of Augustus. Their findings could change the way city policing works. | Hyperallergic

The vote on Central Park’s contested suffragist monument has been postponed. The New York City Public Design Commission said that the statue, which features Sojourner Truth alongside Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, still failed to address its concerns. | Hyperallergic

Sam Gilliam, “Coffee Thyme” (1980), color oil crayon on paper (© Sam Gilliam, Courtesy Steven Andersen, Vermillion Editions, Ltd.)

A new poll seems to reveal a correlation between support of President Donald Trump and how harshly one judges Sam Gilliam’s 1980 study “Coffee Thyme.” | Hyperallergic

A new study that examined the collections of major American and European museums found that male specimens outnumbered female specimens across most ancient and modern mammals with the exception of bats, anteaters, and sloths. | Hyperallergic

Installation view, “America” (2016), Victory is Not an Option, Maurizio Cattelan at Blenheim Palace, 2019 (photo by Tom Lindboe, all images courtesy of Blenheim Art Foundation)

Oh, crap! Thieves stole Maurizio Cattelan’s golden toilet from the Blenheim Art Foundation. Thus far, two suspects have been arrested. | Hyperallergic

Klaus Littmann, FOR FOREST – The Unending Attraction of Nature (2019), Wörthersee Stadium in Klagenfurt, Austria (photo by Gerhard Maurer)

In Austria, curator Klaus Littmann has filled a soccer stadium with 299 trees. However, the living exhibition has drawn the ire of two rightwing parties — Alliance for the Future of Austria (BZÖ) and the Austrian Freedom Party (FPÖ) — who falsely claim the installation is funded by tax dollars. DW reports that BZÖ urged people to show up outside the stadium in the day of the exhibition’s September 8 opening with chainsaws. | Hyperallergic

Check out Hyperallergic’s selection of art-related events happening in New York City for Climate Week. | Hyperallergic

Richard Prince, Album art for A Tribe Called Quest’s We Got It From Here… Thank You for Your Service (2016) (image courtesy Wikimedia)

The rapper Q-Tip — member of the iconic hip-hop group A Tribe Called Quest — has loaned his personal art collection for public view for the first time. The 13 pieces will be featured in a non-selling exhibition, Q-Tip: The Collection, at Bonhams in New York, and will include work from artists like Hebru Brantley, Jeff Elrod, the director Harmony Korine, and Richard Prince, who did the album art for A Tribe Called Quest’s latest record We Got It From Here… Thank You for Your Service (2016). “My hope is that this exhibition will encourage visitors to learn something new, be inspired, and discover the brilliance of some of these incredible emerging artists,” Q-Tip said in a statement.

This and other notable sales and acquisitions are chronicled in our latest Transactions story.

The City of Cambridge Arts Council is seeking artist submissions for a $300,000 public art commission to commemorate the 19th Amendment. Applications must be submitted by September 30. Learn about other opportunities you can apply for this month in our latest “Opportunities for Artists in September 2019.”

Also, check out Hyperallergic’s lists of must-see, fun, and insightful art events in New York and Los Angeles this fall.

This Week in the Art World

Deborah Kass “OY/YO” in DUMBO, Brooklyn in 2016 (via Leo Gonzales/Flickr)

Ladan Akbarnia was appointed curator of South Asian and Islamic Art at the San Diego Museum of Art. | via email announcement

Candida Alvarez and David Antonio Cruz are now represented by Monique Meloche Gallery. | via email announcement

Ghada Amer is now represented by Marianne Boesky Gallery. | via email announcement

Aimé Iglesias Lukin was appointed director and chief curator of visual arts of the Americas Society. | via email announcement

Deborah Kass is now represented by Kavi Gupta Gallery. | via email announcement

William Kentridge and Mona Hatoum were awarded the Praemium Imperiale awards. | ARTnews

Yuki Kihara will represent New Zealand in the 2021 Venice Biennale. | ARTnews

Séverine Lepape was appointed director of Paris’s Musée de Cluny. | Connaissance des Arts

Betelhem Makonnen was awarded the $15,000 Tito’s Prize for artists working in and around Austin. | Glasstire

Cameron Shaw was named deputy director and chief curator at the California African American Museum. | via email announcement

Lorna Simpson, Ed Ruscha, and Mary Beard were awarded the J. Paul Getty Medal. | via email announcement

Maximillian William Gallery opened a space in London. | via email announcement

In Memoriam

Juanita Abernathy (1931–2019), civil rights leader | NYT

William Y. Chang (1916–2019), translator and journalist | AV Press

Luigi Colani (1928–2019), industrial designer | NYT

Steve Dalachinsky (1946–2019), poet | The Villager

Gyorgy Konrad (1933–2019), novelist and essayist | NYT

comments (0)