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Support the Queens Museum of Art

Food artist Tattfoo Tan in taking part in QMA’s Gala

If the Queens Museum of Art isn’t the most well-known museum, it certainly is one of the most resourceful as it seems to work wonders with the limited resources they have.

Tomorrow (Wednesday, June 9) is QMA’s annual gala and we can’t think of an institution that deserves your support more than this one. Please consider supporting one of the borough of Queens’s leading venues for contemporary art.

Tickets are $300 [BUY HERE] or it you can’t make the event you can make a DONATION ONLINE and be:

The event will honor Grimshaw Architects (the designers of QMA’s current expansion project), Alessandra DiGiusto (chief administrative officer of the Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation), and Lung-Fong Chen (founder of the Taiwan Center in Flushing).

For more information, visit the QMA website or the Gala 2.010 blog.

And more accolades for QMA …

Jessica Rylan, “NanoQMA” (2010). 40 micrometers x 110 micrometers. (via queensmuseum.org)

If QMA is best known for the Queens International and their impressive panorama of the city of New York, they also deserves some credit for interesting exhibitions that showcase emerging and established names. Currently, QMA is exhibiting two shows which may be of interest to Hyperallergic readers:

Working Stiffs: Photography from the Collection — 50 photographs have been selected from QMA’s permanent collection “to articulate what it is to work, cross-culturally and geographically, throughout the 19th and 20th centuries.” Features photographers include Berenice Abbott, Felice Beato, Josef Breitenbach, Jack Clarity, Roger Fenton, Lewis W. Hine, Dorothea Lange, George Platt Lynes, Reginald Marsh, Sylvia Plachy, Aleksandr Rodchenko and many others.

The Curse of Bigness — Which their website explains, “is inspired by the Museum’s ‘gigantic miniatures’ — the Panorama of New York City, the model of the Watershed, and the Unisphere in our front yard-which, when you think about it, are large and small at the same time.” Included in the exhibition is artist Jessica Rylan’s 40 micrometers by 110 micrometers sculptural representation of the QMA titled “NanoQMA” (2010) — seeing is believing!

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