Opinion

This Artist Is Toasted

Wanna munch on Munch's "Scream"? (All images via instagram.com/idafrosk)
Wanna munch on Munch’s “Scream”? (All images via instagram.com/idafrosk)

CHICAGO — When isn’t art good for breakfast? Oslo-based artist Ida Skivenes makes all types of food art out using a piece of toast on a kitchen plate as her canvas. The other week, she found herself stuck in front of a computer rather than freestyling in the kitchen, and so she looked up Johannes Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring, and transformed it into a tasty, carby portrait. She posts these and many other art history-inspired toasts to her Instagram account. Scroll through her feed and you’ll find yourself wanting to eat, rather than look at, works of art by Salvador Dali, Picasso, Edvard Munch, and Frida Kahlo. These are the kinds of art-food that we’d like to see on social media sites, rather than the ubiquitous amateur shots of food porn that are even more prevalent thanks to apps like FoodSpotting and its seamless integration into Facebook last year.

Salvador Dali – The Persistence of Memory, 1931
Salvador Dali, “The Persistence of Memory,” (1931)
Johannes Vermeer, Girl with a Pearl Earring
Johannes Vermeer, “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” (1665)
Mondrian
Mondrian

 

Edvard Munch – Girls on the Jetty, c. 1899
Edvard Munch, “Girls on the Jetty,” (1899)
Van Gogh's Sunflowers, we assume on sunflower bread
Van Gogh’s Sunflowers, we assume on sunflower bread

 

Frida Kahlo
Frida Kahlo
A Rothko
A Rothko

 

Rene Magritte
Rene Magritte

We also noticed that Skivenes is a nerd for Instagram, and so we decided to take this one step further and ask: What would emoji art history as edible art history toast look like? Surely, Skivenes is but one step away from doing this already as indicated by her Instagram-inspired toast.

Screen shot 2013-06-05 at 12.50.25 PM

We reached out to the artist to see if she would in fact make an emoji art history toast for us, and received this answer:

“I think the emoji art history project is absolutely hilarious but I do not see how I could possibly contribute anything to it,” artist Ida Skivenes tells Hyperallergic via email. “Its form is what gives it the strength. :)”

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