Articles

A View from the Easel

CHICAGO — The 39th installment of a series in which artists send in a photo and a description of their workspace.

Want to take part? Submit your studio — just check out the submission guidelines.

Frank Juarez, Sheboygan, Wisconsin (site)

frankjuarez_studio

My studio is an extension of how I am as an artist. I work on various projects at once. I may be painting, drawing, photographing, promoting, and so on. I do not keep a physical sketchbook of my ideas, but rather my mind is my sketchbook. Once I get excited about an idea I have various locations within my studio in which I can make them a reality. Not all ideas are great ideas, but the thrill of execution and the unknown are satisfying to me. This process enables me to function in life and allows me the freedom to keep exploring.

Paul Roustan, Patwucket, Rhode Island (site)

Roustan

Two months ago, I moved into my first studio space. It is a cozy little 100+ square foot area, just enough for my needs.

I have been body painting, that is, painting on people, for about eight years now. I used to work primarily from home or I’d drag my equipment to wherever the models were and proceed to paint them in their space and photograph them there or on location. But now I have the luxury of never having to pack up shop.

In my new space, you can see a platform where a model can stand so I don’t have to kneel or pain my back while painting a model’s legs. To the left of that is my handy compressor, supplying the airflow for my airbrush. On the pedestal further left, against a heap of supplies, is where I place my palette of body makeup and airbrushes for the current project. Behind the pedestal is a DIY background folded in half. I apply various wallpapers to give me variety in photographic backdrops, as opposed to the limited look of black or white paper rolls.

The space is one of 10 private studio spaces in a collaborative art space complete with kitchen, gallery, showers, and central work area. It houses various artists from painters, sculptors, jewelry makers, and pottery makers.

Along with having a home base for my work, the energy of working alongside various artists makes for a very affordable, motivating, and inspiring art space. Also being able to display my work at a moments notice is a welcomed improvement from storing them in the basement.

Andy Frost, Madison, New Hampshire (site)

Frost

This is my studio wall and my helper puppy, Woody. The paintings in progress are for a series called Girls on the Wall, Six Feet Tall. I’m fortunate to have a large private workspace in my home. I love to work deep into the night then, in the morning I am sometimes surprised at what my paintings have done!

Carol Mangiagalli, Caledon, South Africa (site)

Mangiagalli

The room where I paint is small and the walls are full of paintings, but as I work on one painting at a time I can control the chaos! It is in my house and I have a view onto the front garden which is full of trees, plants and birds. I use the table for varnishing finished paintings. The small office filing cabinet behind the easel contains my ideas and sketches.

Tiffany Gholar, Chicago, Illinois (site)

SONY DSC

My studio is in the Fine Arts Building in downtown Chicago. I use half of it for interior design projects and writing, and the other side for painting. The painting on the easel is called “Color Cornucopia.” I am almost finished with it. It’s made of recycled cardboard. I call my style post-consumerism because I work with recycled materials. Because I want to paint sustainably, I wash my brushes in the plastic buckets that are on the floor and let the water evaporate, leaving behind dried paint skins that I use in other pieces. You can tell I just had an open studio because my painting area is neat for a change, and also because there is a big chunk of leftover ice melting into one of the buckets I was using to wash my paintbrushes. I try to make sure that nothing goes to waste.

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