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The End of Performance Art as We Know It

So I clicked on Jillian Steinhauer’s post — “Is Marina Abramović Trying to Create a Performance Art Utopia?” — and the first thing that popped into my head was, “Why does it look like a suburban public library, circa 1962?” What I’m talking about is the architectural rendering from none other than OMA’s leading lights, Shohei Shigematsu and Rem Koolhaas, gracing the head of Steinhauer’s article, which was published by Hyperallergic on Monday.

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Dirty Art

Dirt is getting its moment in the sun. A cluster of recent shows in Chelsea and downtown make the most of soil, making it a good time to think about earth art again.

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Art Rx

This week, the doctor wants you to travel. From the Upper East Side to the art-borhood of Ridgewood, Queens, you have a long way to go before you get over whatever it is you have.

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Frieze Fatigue

I had heard that Frieze New York was huge, but I have been to Armory and Basel Miami, so I assumed that it was just another art fair, sure there would be a lot of stuff to look at, but nothing this hardened New Yorker couldn’t handle.

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26th Street Courts the Masses with a Block Party

In unofficial conjunction with the inauguration of Frieze New York on Randall’s Island, the galleries on Chelsea’s 26th Street decided to go big and throw a block party last Saturday. If there is one kind of party that galleries excel at, it’s glamorous and exclusive after-hours functions, on a rooftop suite somewhere far above the streets of Chelsea; if there’s one area where galleries are found unanimously wanting, it’s dealing with the public, with “regular” people, the viewers who venture through their doors simply to look and not to buy. Considering this, it was surprising and encouraging to see high-end Chelsea galleries reaching out, in a coordinated effort, to the art-going public.

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Can We Queer the (Art) World, and Why Should We?

I’m going to start this essay with the conclusion. Why should we be looking for different ways of thinking about and living in the world? Because many of the dominant political social, and intellectual structures that currently underpin our society have proven themselves to be colossally flawed, so we need to begin looking for different ways of doing and thinking about things.

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Artists as Job Creators

CHICAGO — The National Governors Association has just issued a report titled “New Engines for Growth: Five Roles for Arts, Culture and Design.” I decided to read the whole thing, a task that I approached with some dread, given the prospect of wading through 45 pages of corporate art-speak. In fact, it turns out that the report is written in a refreshingly clear style, and it lays out a set of concrete proposals that make sense to anyone who has thought about this subject.