Posted inArt

The INTERNETworked Bridge: Connected But Unequal

BEIJING — I moved to China almost a year ago now, into a country where I knew no one and where even the internet was foreign. I pulled away from my main social circle geographically, but did what I could do stay connected via the internet and phone.

And yet, just as I turned to the internet for social connection, I also realized it was increasingly difficult to rely on my usual circles. Timezones, the Great Firewall and the weak internet connection in my neighborhood all made me realize that the utopian ideal of global connection was far from being achieved.

Posted inArt

A Taste of Tomorrow Night’s (Thurs Oct 13) Event with Ecoarttech

Tomorrow, Hyperallergic is hosting Leila Nadir and Cary Peppermint of Ecoarttech. The event will explore the convergent ecologies of art, media and the environment in what the duo is calling “nature 2.0.” Their topic is timely and fascinating — not to mention complex and nuaced — so I asked them to explain a little about what they will talk about on Thursday night. The following is a short interview.

Posted inArt

Map Paintings: An Interview with Loren Munk

I’ve been following the work of Loren Munk for years and had the pleasure of seeing the work currently on display at Lesley Heller in his studio years ago before most people even knew they existed. Today, Munk has been exhibiting regularly and developing a following for his map works that document art world scenes in New York and elsewhere. There is a frenzy of color in his paintings and the choices are obviously subjective (and rife with personal politics) but they are intense explosions of information carefully organized and constructed like a spider web in paint. I spoke to Munk about his latest show, Location, Location, Location, Mapping the New York Art World, on the Lower East Side that continues until this Sunday, October 16.

Posted inArt

The Many Views of Christopher Columbus

October 12, observed yesterday as a holiday, is most commonly known as Columbus Day in the United States, but is also recognized as Dia de la Raza throughout Latin America, as well as Indigenous People’s Day. Fraught with controversy, the various iterations of this holiday reflect the range of perspectives on Christopher Columbus and his legacies. The Columbus Day of my youth celebrates the heroic “discoverer” of the Americas, playing up mythical stories of his genius on insisting the world was round, and often neglecting the icky bits about the ensuing genocide of the indigenous peoples of the Americas.

Posted inArt

Eye on the Lo-Fi: DIY Flicks

Like all things punk, DIY cinema is a bit rough around the edges. But, isn’t that what makes it so much fun? Kicking off in midsummer with the release of Céline Danhier’s Blank City, punk films have been having a bit of a revival — and, while we’re at it — a reinvigoration.

Posted inArt

From Courbet to the Bronx, The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Names Gets Marriage Memorial

When Woodlawn Cemetery was established in the Bronx in 1863, the art of funerary commemoration was in its height. That era of memorial sculpture ended, and most of us are laid to rest under somber slabs of dark granite with only the barest of ornamentation. Patricia Cronin saw the revival of this tradition as a way to not only create a lasting tribute to her and her wife’s love on their burial plot in Woodlawn, but to build a memorial to a marriage she thought they would never be able to have.

Posted inArt

#OccupyWallStreet’s Art Exhibition: Celebration and Harsh Realities [UPDATED]

This Saturday I visited No Comment, an art exhibition in response to Occupy Wall Street at the historic JP Morgan Building. the general vibe of “No Comment” perfectly captured what has been growing in Zuccotti Park and is now spreading across the country. Even though most of the works were laden with the struggles of the 99%, there was also a strong sense of community and celebration among visitors.

Posted inArt

The Evolving World of #OccupyLA

LOS ANGELES — I returned to Occupy LA on Thursday night and discovered double the amount of people since I visited on Tuesday. Tents spanned across the entire span of the north and west lawns, many spilling out onto the sidewalk. In addition to media and first aid, occupiers had set up a lending library and press table for others to check out books and magazines. Occupy LA braces for big things as it expands its numbers and operations.

Posted inArt

Seeing Through the Crowds Part III at the 2011 Venice Biennale: The Unofficial Exhibitions

During the Biennale, innumerable numbers of events take place outside of the official Biennale grounds of the Giardini and Arsenale, especially from countries that couldn’t afford pavilions inside the Arsenale. They either rented out abandoned spaces near it, like the Iraqi pavilion did, or, if they couldn’t afford that, asked friends who own a little art gallery in between gift shops if they could use their space. Here are some oddities of note.

Posted inArt

Conceptual Artist Bob and Roberta Smith Puts Us All in Charge

This week I had the pleasure of talking to British conceptual artist Patrick Brill, better known as his alter ego Bob and Roberta Smith. We talked about visiting the Occupy Wall Street protests, starting a new political party and the history behind his alter ego. The conversation was charged with one powerful message—art can, and must, be valued and nurtured for its social and political potential. Through art, we can all be in charge.