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Kuwaiti Censors Shut Down Art Show Because of Complaints

KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait — On the evening of March 5, contemporary Kuwaiti artist Shurooq Amin opened her anticipated solo exhibition in Kuwait’s Al M. Gallery. A large crowd of people was in attendance, and many pieces were sold immediately after the doors opened at 8 pm. But by 10 pm local police ordered the exhibition closed and started questioning the artist and gallery owner on-site.

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Without Elaboration (Part 2)

In 1981, Bess was reintroduced (or, for many of us) introduced by way of a small one-person exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Barbara Haskell organized the show and there was a small pamphlet available for free. According to the pamphlet, the symbols in Bess’ work were based on “obscure sexual references” and there was something “lurid” about them.

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Second Sight: The Photographs of George Hendrik Breitner

It’s unlikely, half a century from now, that a shadow oeuvre will appear among the personal effects of many contemporary artists, a secret body of work that parallels or even exceeds their public output. This is what happened with the Dutch painter George Hendrik Breitner (1857–1923), whose several thousand photographs emerged from obscurity only in 1961 and might plausibly have been lost forever.

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What to Do with Useless Objects or the Playful Political Art of Máximo González

LOS ANGELES — The Craft and Folk Art Museum (CAFAM) in Los Angeles is a gem of a museum. Small, but certainly limber, the museum is bringing the worlds of contemporary art and craft together with its ongoing shows. Taking up the largest third floor gallery — or the place of honor, as I’d like to think of it — is Maximo Gonzalez, a Mexico City-based Argentinian artist who makes delicate and fanciful art infused with a slightly subversive message from castaways.

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But, Is It Punk?

Any punk with their wits about them is bound to react rather viscerally to the words “punk rock,” “rainbow” and “sparkle” being tossed together in the same salad of a sentence. So, naturally, when I walked into Jonathan LeVine gallery last month to catch the tail-end of Natalia Fabia’s East Coast debut, I shivered at the sight of its title. Punk Rock Rainbow Sparkle? I shook my head, wondering what I had walked into. Whatever it was, I stood convinced that at best it would be an uncomfortable experience I’d hopefully forget. However, I soon got a schooling in the life lesson, “you can’t judge a book by its cover,” or rather, you can’t judge a show by its title.