Posted inArt

Happy 6 Month Anniversary!

Today marks the six month anniversary of the official launch of Hyperallergic and we’re in the mood to celebrate! In honor of this fantastic mini-milestone we have finally decided to throw a small informal launch party at Hyperallergic HQ in Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

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Art World Ikeas

A new generation of websites selling prints by contemporary artists are emerging as the Ikeas of the art world — they sell editions, from large to small runs, of different kinds of work, from traditional prints to paintings and drawings. At high volume and low prices, these sites make the most of their populist position: buying art need not be hard!

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Underpaid Labor at the Art Show

My friend was trying to convince me the other day that $20 was not an unreasonable amount for a museum to ask visitors to pay. We were standing in the lobby of the Whitney shortly after the Biennial had opened, and maybe I was having none of it simply because I was feeling snarky while remembering previous years when I occasionally got invited to the press opening or whatever. Or maybe it was because I’m basically a starving student still, while already well-advanced in years, and such amounts really are a significant outlay for me.

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Artists Go Hollywood: The Movie Posters

The impressive performance of Ed Harris in Pollock is the first thing that pops into my head when I think about the intersection of fine art and film. However, there are many more examples of Hollywood getting all creative and artsy … And so I say to Hollywood: Enough. Let’s branch out, diversify, and push our art flicks into some exciting new genres …

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Exploring Early Computer Art, 1950-1980

Personal computing may have begun in the 1980s but the history of computer art started much earlier during a period when only a few visionaries sensed the impact computers were going to have on our lives. The Slovakia-based Translab has posted a good online archive of early computer art from names that aren’t widely known but were important for their early work with computers.

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Taking it into the Third Dimension: New York’s Sculptural Street Art

In my travels across New York City documenting street art and graffiti, I’m always excited when I stumble across full-blown illicit installations. While stenciling and wheatpasting continue to explode in popularity, it takes another level of commitment, chutzpah if you will, to pull off something more involved. Using salvaged or re-appropriated materials, NYC street artists are both piggybacking their pieces onto existing street furniture and brazenly installing work of their own.

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#ObscureMuseum, Easter Edition: The Fonck Museum (Viña del Mar, Chile)

When I went to visit some friends in Viña del Mar, Chile, my first thoughts weren’t about the famous beaches and coastline, but of the museums, if any, they might have in this sizeable resort town (population 286,931) that’s south of the famous port city of Valparaíso. I was thrilled to find that the town had several museums. Since this is a column on obscure (and by that I mean little-known and not necessarily dimly-lit or incomprehensible) museums, I’ll fill you in a bit on one that absolutely blew my mind.

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Terry Richardson: How A Controversy Becomes A Beast

It started in Paris during the second week of March. When New York-based artist and famed fashion photographer Terry Richardson ran into the Danish model Rie Rasmussen at a fashion event, he found himself confronted by the latter. According to Rasmussen, she accused him of abusing his power to exploit young models for his overtly sexual images, upon which Richardson fled the scene and later called her agency to complain. This in turn prompted Rasmussen to vent more publicly.

Posted inArt

1% for the Arts: A Hollow Gesture?

The town government of Suwanee, Georgia approved an ordinance which would ask all real estate developers to donate 1% of the budget of the building cost toward a public art project. The Atlanta Journal Constitution writes, “Where many struggling cities see public art as an extravagance these days, Suwanee, on firmer ground financially, sees it as a key to a prosperous future.”