Posted inOpinion

New Gap Logo is a Generic Fail

Gap definitely knows how to make it viral. The question is, was the Internet scandal caused by its new logo actually worth the publicity? When the historically consistent clothing brand switched the logo on its website from the old three-letters-in-a-square to the new monstrosity, the web reaction was immediate and decisive: the logo sucks. Not only does it suck on the level of the 2012 London Olympic Games logo, unlike London, the re-design doesn’t even have the balls to be interesting.

The logo isn’t anything revolutionary. At this point, a switch to Helvetica — or Corporate A Pro Demi Condensed, News Gothic Demi or whatever it is — is about the oldest trick in the book. But what’s more surprising is that the design doesn’t seem to have anything to redeem it at all. It’s a masterpiece of ambiguity.

Posted inOpinion

Hyperallergic TV’s Reactor Podcast: Discussing PS1’s “Greater New York”

Today, we are launching our first Reactor podcast with a critical discussion of PS1’s Greater New York 2010 exhibition. Hosted by Hyperallergic editor Hrag Vartanian, the podcast features Paddy Johnson of Art Fag City, artist/critic William Powhida, as well as, Liza Eliano of Art Fag City, Holly Gover of Hyperallergic, and Warren King, who is currently interning with Powhida.

Posted inOpinion

Robert Longo Parodies Himself

Robert Longo is the king of that detached world of 80s über-cool, though in retrospect the whole “movement” (if we can call it that) was nothing like its PR. Sure, one could be fooled into thinking that Longo’s corporate figures writhing out of control were comments on the culture of the time, perhaps even foreboding what was to come — Reaganomics, corporate avarice, an extreme form of alienation — but did we really think it would lead to advertisements for Bottega Veneta?

Posted inOpinion

Why the Arts Needs the Online World

If you are reading this blogazine then you probably already know this to be true but we thought you’d like to know about this story on ReadWriteWeb:

A study released this month by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) found that people who engage with the arts through various digital media are three times more likely (59% over 21%) to attend live arts performances, and do so twice as often (6 events per year over 3) as non-media participants … the survey concluded that “media-based arts participation appears to encourage — rather than replace — live arts attendance.”