Subscribe to our newsletter

Get the latest news, reviews, and commentary delivered directly to your inbox.

Support Hyperallergic’s independent arts journalism.

Posted inOpinion

Best of Richard Flood/Prairie Dogs … Redux

Our post this morning about the New Museum’s Richard Flood and his bizarre blogging-related remarks caused a frenzy of commentary and activity online. Check out the best from Twitter, our commenters, Jerry Saltz’s Facebook page, and the prairie dogs (aka bloggers) themselves!

We’ve decided to summarize some of the funniest and most clever things people have written (in no particular order) about the post written by the talented Lisa Radon. The comments have been edited for clarity.

Posted inArt

1% for the Arts: A Hollow Gesture?

The town government of Suwanee, Georgia approved an ordinance which would ask all real estate developers to donate 1% of the budget of the building cost toward a public art project. The Atlanta Journal Constitution writes, “Where many struggling cities see public art as an extravagance these days, Suwanee, on firmer ground financially, sees it as a key to a prosperous future.”

Posted inArt

New Museum’s Richard Flood Equates Bloggers with Prairie Dogs

Referencing prairie dogs and Mussolini, yesterday New Museum chief curator Richard Flood wound up his talk at the Portland Art Museum on “Creating Networks: The New Internationalism” with some bracing criticism of his own directed at online critique of his institution. Unlike the rest of his talk which very sharply traced American art world’s relationship with work by international artists 1980s to present from his vantage points at the Barbara Gladstone Gallery, Artforum, the Walker Art Center, the New Museum, his final comments were wildly out of touch with the ways we have conversations about art now.

Posted inArt

The High Line Park: Before & After

I’m not sure exactly when I became aware of the High Line, but once you noticed it, it was hard to forget. There were giant graffiti pieces visible from street level and in the spring and summer you could see a ragged blaze of green sprouting from the otherwise lifeless tracks. I remember walking along Tenth and Eleventh Avenues — peering up at the hulking structure and wondering how I could get up there.