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Posted inOpinion

Best Comments of the Week, Oct 29

Every week, we’ll recap the best comments we’ve received on Hyperallergic’s posts, whether that’s on the blogazine itself, on Twitter, Tumblr, or Facebook. Be sure to check in every Friday for new comments. This week, readers respond to the UK arts funding cuts, Hans Ulrich Obrist’s book reading extravaganzas and apartment exhibition vogue.

Posted inNews

Get Ready for #TheSocialGraph

In two weeks, #TheSocialGraph will open at Outpost in Bushwick, Brooklyn and we’re incredibly excited. What is #TheSocialGraph? It is an evolving exploration of the burgeoning field of social media art and the relation of contemporary art with this populist tool as a medium, facilitator, and subject for art.

I am the curator of the project and I’ve pulled together a number of interesting artists, writers, social media mavens, and others to share ideas and explore possibilities presented by the intersection of visual art and social media. Some of the art in #TheSocialGraph will be about social media, some will use social media as an integral component of the finished project, and some will be more of an experiment so we’re not exactly sure what to call it.

Posted inArt

WTF is… Superflat?

You may have heard the term “Superflat” tossed around in relation to some paintings reminiscent of Saturday morning cartoons on crack, or maybe a series of drawings that look familiar, but with an extra dash of foreign, outer-space weirdness. You’ve probably heard of “kawaii” culture or maybe even Kaikai-Kiki. And if you haven’t? Fear not, because we’re going to go through all this vocab together to marshal what exactly Superflat is.

Posted inOpinion

Salander’s “Blameless” Victims?

The Washington Post, always the voice for the powerful, connected, and well-moneyed, has an article on the victims of art dealer Lawrence Salander. They’ve tracked down Earl Davis, the son of American modern master Stuart Davis, some psychiatrist whose father’s collection was entrusted to the dealer, and a few others.

What the Post “reports” is a tale of blameless victims taken advantage of by the big bad Salander. And trust me, I don’t have any affection for the bigwig dealer turned con man, but there are some questions that the Post doesn’t ask …

Posted inOpinion

Hot Celebrities Do Wonders For LA Art Museums

Did you know that Jeffrey Deitch is a celebrity? I bet you did. Did you know he lives in a “movie star mansion” in the “trendy L.A. neighborhood of Los Feliz”? I bet you didn’t, and I bet you didn’t care either. “Celebrity has become, for better or worse, an art form,” Deitch says. Well, the LA MoCA director must be a pretty great artist, or the LA Times wouldn’t be publishing his very own episode of Cribs.

Posted inOpinion

Art World Halloween Costumes

We at Hyperallergic know it’s close to Halloween because of all the articles giving us last minute costume ideas! Now, a slutty viking or a faux-Gaga meat dress might be fine if you’re just going to some random Halloween party with a bunch of normal people. But what if you’re going to that special Halloween benefit at MoMA? Or trick or treating up and down Chelsea? Here are a few costume ideas that will get you street cred in the art world.

Posted inArt

Apartment Shows, A Trend I Hope Keeps Growing

Artists have been having informal apartment shows as long as anyone can remember but in the last few years there has been a growing trend in New York (particularly Brooklyn) of quirky apartment art exhibits that I hope continues to grow.

Last night, I stopped by Julie Torres’s apartment, you’ll remember her as the watercolor “street” artist, for a birthday celebration that included a lovely small show of all her artist friends. Torres not only curated the salon style display but carefully prepared a checklist, which made the experience of looking fun and enjoyable.

Posted inNews

What’s Up With UK Arts Funding Cuts?

Arts Council England, a group within the English governmental Department of Art, Media and Sport, is an organization entirely devoted to funding the arts, performing, visual and literary. In total, the council currently funds 880 arts organizations and events. In September, “Britain’s coalition government of Conservatives and Liberal Democrats proposed a budget that could cut arts spending by as much as 25 percent,” reports the New York Times, a move that would help reduce the country’s budget deficit.

It’s still not clear where the budget cuts will lead, but it’s clear that artists and art organizations are speaking up against the disastrous impact the cuts could have.

Posted inBooks

Reading Ian Berry’s Fred Tomaselli

The Brooklyn Museum’s catalog for their Fred Tomaselli exhibition is pretty mammoth for a show that only takes up three galleries. Still, the tome serves well as a way to expand on ideas presented in the exhibition and give a greater view of the artist’s work than would otherwise be possible in the limited space. Just do yourself a favor and don’t stop at the book version.

The diversity of works included in the catalog, from early installations and sculptures to constellation drug charts and later lacquered collages, is fascinating to see, but the ability to see so much at once also comes at a cost.

Posted inArt

Art Stars Fly Their Freak Flag for Hans Ulrich Obrist’s New Interview Book

Obrist is strange. There, I said it. In an event that often felt like a coffee klatch at Obrist’s house, the art world power broker known as Hans Ulrich Obrist — he’s #2 on Art Review’s Power 100 — had a book reading last Saturday at MoMA’s PS1 in Long Island City for his newest publication, Hans Ulrich Obrist: Interviews, Volume 2. The event venue looked like a cross between a set for the Last Supper and a conference stage thrown together by Leni Riefenstahl and there was coffee and books being served on the periphery of the event.

Posted inArt

How the Guggenheim’s “Play” Failed

The first offering of the Guggenheim’s Youtube Play biennial kicked off with a lot of spectacle, not limited to a ladder-perch musical performance by Ok Go and a stage setting more suited to a television show than an art exhibition. From the emcee to the nightclub vibe, this was no normal biennial exhibition. In fact, judged as an art exhibition, I think Play was a failure.

However, that doesn’t mean the whole event was a failure. In evaluating Play I think we have to first carefully state our terms- what we’re judging the show as and what we’re judging it against.