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Posted inNews

Smithsonian Show Not “Gay” Enough for Artinfo?

A Facebook post is sometimes a dangerous thing. When Artinfo’s “What’s Troubling about the Smithsonian’s Gay Art Show,” re-titled “What’s Troubling About the Smithsonian’s Hide/Seek Show,” article was posted to their Facebook page, it was re-captioned with the admittedly punchy line: “Are sexuality and gender appropriate themes for a Smithsonian art exhibition?” The ensuing response thread involved commenters, the show’s curators, and a game of journalistic hedging. It turns out that this “reviewer” hadn’t even seen the show they critiqued.

Posted inOpinion

Purple’s Olivier Zahm Just Really Loves Women, Bro

Reports hold that Purple Magazine editor Olivier Zahm, widely known for being a skeezy dude who documents his love sex life obsessively online on Purple’s Diary, is just super into the ladies. Says Rachel Chandler, a Purple contributor, “A lot of people think he’s a sexist pig… What they don’t get is that he really loves women. Like, more than any man I’ve ever met.” A New York Times profile has the details.

Posted inOpinion

Art Teachers Rock!

I came across this wonderful story in the Hackensack Chronicle and my heart melted. Art teachers are the heart and soul of the visual arts but they often don’t get the recognition they deserve. I was happy to hear that this small group of teachers in Hackensack was recognized by the Art Educators of New Jersey for their service.

I have personally benefited immensely from great art teachers and I’ve been fortunate enough to have quite a few along the way. The one who made the biggest impression on me was Toronto painter Ron Satok, who is famous for having painted a prominent mural at the original Hockey Hall of Fame in Toronto. Incredibly, Satok is blind.

Posted inArt

What To Do At Prospect 1.5’s Comeback Opening

Prospect.1 New Orleans was the biggest biennial ever staged on US soil, and that’s the least of the accomplishments of Dan Cameron’s 2008 exhibition. The show brought attention to what continues to be an area badly damaged by disaster and in danger of falling out of the public eye. Prospect 1.0 was a symbol of the resurgence of the city and the ability of contemporary art to provoke, possibly the height of the current biennial miracle vogue. The exhibition collected an international crew of artists and brought them to New Orleans to create projects that reacted to a local context. But two years later, what’s on for the show’s next incarnation?