Online Art Galleries Go Indie

Lately, the art world has been awash in technology-driven art start-ups, including well-funded ventures like 20×200, Artsy, and Artspace that dominate headlines by providing access to buying (or at least window shopping) art to a wider audience than blue-chip collectors. Making the gallery experience less intimidating is all well and good, but what about the nice parts of going to a small, hip art space and being able to pick out a piece that you might be able to afford? The good news is that a pair of independent, effortlessly cool online art galleries have recently launched to provide engaged collectors with the chance to follow specific curatorial voices.

Why Not to Work for Jeff Koons

At this very moment many young artists are endlessly scrolling through the job listings on New York Foundation for the Arts hoping to find anything that slightly resembles a paying job. Then it suddenly appears, a job listing by no other than Jeff Koons. I’ve always wondered why someone would ever want to work in Koon’s factory. Unless you have an undying love for painting photorealistic lobsters or would like to become an expert in polishing balloon dogs, what’s the point?

Downton Abbey and the Perils of Preservation

Downton Abbey is downsizing — or at least it was, for a hot second. If you’ve been following the post-Edwardian miniseries, you’ll know that the Crawley family, who lives in the show’s eponymous grand estate house, was in danger of losing their lavish lifestyle. The show’s patriarch Robert Crawley, the Earl of Grantham, had made a bad investment in Canadian railway, and now, at the dawn of the 1920s, the family would have to sell the colossal Yorkshire manor and be forced to move into (gasp!) a house staffed by only eight servants. The story line was all-too-neatly wrapped up when Matthew, the newest member of the family, finally agreed to hand over a fortune that came in a recent inheritance to save Downton.

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