Posted inArt

“Concerned New Yorkers” Hatch Poster Project for Park51

It’s impossible to escape the heated rhetoric around Park51 in lower Manhattan. And now Adam Wissing, Kenny Komer, and Boris Rasin, who have been making a name for themselves for their clever and in-your-face street interventions, have joined the very public fray with a poster campaign that invites people on the street to voice their opinions in writing. We caught up with them to ask about their latest project.

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Peeking Behind the Veil: Princess Hijab

I sit down with my laptop in a quiet, central Brooklyn café, not far from Prospect Park on a slightly overcast day in August to interview the mysterious Parisian street artist Princess Hijab. I order a San Pellegrino with lime; she abstains from any snacks or beverages. Despite the time difference from France, she’s alert and ready to engage with me. I go into the interview knowing how she guards her anonymity, and the concrete details of her identity remain elusive — this is an email interview after all.

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Mr. Dropout Is Serious

Nate Hill is at a crossroads. After a series of performances steeped in childhood imagery, he’s ready for something new. For an artist his age it’s amazing that he’s already become the subject of posts on Gawker, Time Out NY and other mainstream blogs, an article filled with anger in the Daily News, and never mind the general snarkiness of online citizens (he accused me of being one of those). Yet, Hill feels that Mr. Dropout, his new performance, is about turning a page. Starting a few weeks ago, Hill has been walking the length of Manhattan via Broadway wearing all white, including a gauze veil tucked into a white balaclava.

Posted inArt

Jennifer Dalton is “Making Sense” of Jerry Saltz’s Facebook Page

Now that Jerry Saltz has proven himself — yet again — to be an attention whore with his stint on Work of Art, I’m starting to like him more … yes, I love a car crash. And just when we were all jonesing for another fix of “What is crazy uncle Jerry up to?” Artist Jennifer Dalton is opening a show today at the Flag Art Foundation called “Making Sense,” which (among other things) is an “ … attempt to make sense of … New York magazine art critic Jerry Saltz’s incredibly popular Facebook page.” Let the games begin …

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Honoring US Freedoms Through Dissent: Interview with Dread Scott

In recognition of the Fourth of July, I interviewed groundbreaking artist “Dread” Scott Tyler, whose work is directly engaged in challenging public perception of and reactions to US politics and history. He answered my questions about his desire to engage, America’s relationship to freedom of expression today, nationalism, and the lack of critical discourse around his work.

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Census Art: Anita Glesta Reflects on the History of Counting

In 2004, Brooklyn-based artist Anita Glesta was commissioned by the General Services Administration’s Art in Architecture Program to create a permanent seven-acre landscape intervention for the Census Bureau Headquarters Building in Suitland, Maryland. Six year in the making, on July 12 Glesta will inaugurate her artistic meditation on the idea of counting and numeric order with a global perspective.

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Momo At Home: Making the Public Private

New York street artist Momo’s latest project took place in the unlikely town of Key West in the Florida Keys. The veteran street paster decided to work with locals on a one-to-one basis and create art works that would be integrated into their lives and bring what was normally a public piece of art into a very private domain, the home. Key West’s The Citizen newspaper described the project as “art for the masses.”

Posted inArt

Same Show, Different Channel: An Interview with Tyler Green of Modern Art Notes

On Tuesday, Tyler Green announced that he was leaving his 8 1/2 year stint at ArtsJournal for the mainstream art media world of Louise Blouin Media’s ARTINFO and Modern Painters. The news came as a surprise to many who view Green’s online voice as a cornerstone of the indy art blogosphere. Yet the veteran art blogger — though he dislikes the label — doesn’t expect to change what he already does. The following is the first interview with Green since the big news came out.