Posted inOpinion

Required Reading

Jeff Koons’s art collection, thoughts on LA MOCA’s questionable art history, Invader in Paris, a tour of the Calatrava building in Milwaukee, something fishy about Warhol, iPhone photography and corporate culture and the US government … all on this week’s Required Reading.

Posted inOpinion

iPhone Photojournalism Causes Aesthetic Controversy

That New York Times staff photographer Damon Winter won third place in Pictures of the Year International’s Feature Picture Story competition for his photo essay A Grunt’s Life isn’t surprising. The series of images shows an eloquent portrayal of daily life in a war zone for US troops in and out of action. But where the images came from is pretty unorthodox for mainstream photojournalism: Winter shot the photos on his iPhone, using the Hipstamatic application as a faux-polaroid filter. The problem is that not all photographers agree that Hipstamatic shots constitute the true depiction of events that photojournalists are always seeking.

Posted inOpinion

Warhol Goes App-y

Word is that the Warhol Museum is releasing a new Warhol app (iPhone only for way) that allows users to transform photos into silkscreens that create their own versions of art that resemble the Pop master. But you don’t have to wait for the official version since there are many unofficial ones already on the market, including Warhol FX and myPhotoBooth (both for iPhone) … and there’s much more Warhol for your smartphone.

Posted inArt

Why are iPhone Polaroids so Popular?

You may have seen it on your friend’s Facebook pages or the screen of a mobile phone, on a Twitter image service or a Tumblr blog. An aesthetic rash has been plaguing popular photography as of late, but it’s not a new one. A slew of iPhone ‘Polaroid’ applications are turning people’s visual diaries into retro, oversaturated documents of social lives, friends and lovers. But what makes these applications so popular