InterviewsWeekend

Beer with a Painter: David Humphrey

by Jennifer Samet on October 25, 2014

David Humphrey,

What I hoped to get from talking to David Humphrey were answers. The images in his paintings are zany, raunchy, and wild: a girl in a lawn chair holding monkeys by their scalps; a woman absent-mindedly marking another woman’s buttocks with daubs of paint; cats sitting beside slices of white bread partially spread with peanut butter. I wanted him to explain what it all meant.

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Henri Matisse,

The much-heralded exhibition of Matisse cut-outs currently at the Museum of Modern Art was previously at the Tate Modern, with a few less items than here, but it broke all attendance records and was open all night in its final days.

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Théodore Rousseau,

Consider “Study for The Forest in Winter at Sunset,” a work in oil and charcoal on brown paper by Théodore Rousseau, the 19th-century French painter now under scrutiny at the Morgan Library & Museum. Although it was done between 1845 and 1850, it feels like something Anselm Kiefer might come up with for a 12-foot-wide canvas: a controlled chaos of bare, twisting tree limbs in slashes of paint as dark and smoldering as charred bitumen.

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Material Friction: Americana and American Art

What did John Frederick Kensett, a 19th-century artist part of the Hudson River School, have in common with Thomas Matteson, a blanket chest-maker from Vermont?

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Post image for Frick Garden and Watts Towers Listed Among Most Endangered US Art Landscapes

The Frick Collection’s Russell Page–designed garden, planned for destruction as part of the Manhattan museum’s expansion project, is one of 11 land-based art pieces announced as under threat this week by the Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF).

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Post image for From Goya to Ab-Ex in a Series of Brushstrokes

Dana Saulnier’s ostensibly expressionist canvases at First Street Gallery carry a bravado reminiscent at first glance of mid-century abstraction. Yet they flaunt an obvious distance from their Action painting precursors by the employment of allusive figural references.

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Illustration from

An eight-foot-tall sculpture of a wizard in a couple’s front yard has sparked a debate in the village of Oakland Mills, Maryland, about what constitutes appropriate neighborhood statuary, who has the power to decide what is and isn’t art, and whether or not the towering sorcerer could help lift the community out of economic depression.

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Post image for Opening a Gallery in a Contemporary Art Desert

ALBUQUERQUE — Writer, curator, and (now) gallery owner Nancy Zastudil summarized her experience opening a commercial art gallery in Albuquerque with one Facebook post.

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Installation view of Selina Grüter+Michèle Graf,

The Swiss artists Selina Grüter and Michèle Graf are bringing every hue in the color spectrum to Signal gallery for Exchange Rates Bushwick.

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Post image for Solemn Protest Against Public Art Reactionaries as McCarthy Goes Chocula in Paris

PARIS — About 60 artists and art critics allied with the French chapter of the International Association of Art Critics (AICA) gathered in the Place Vendôme at mid-day Friday near where Paul McCarthy’s once mighty butt plug–based inflatable “Tree” had once stood and stooped. McCarthy himself was absent.

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