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National Endowment for the Arts Skirts Budget Slash in Appropriations Bill

by Mostafa Heddaya on January 14, 2014

trump_cortile

The National Endowment for the Arts, along with several other key federal cultural organizations, will vacate their current offices in the Old Post Office in February 2014, when the 114-year-old national landmark is scheduled to become Trump International Hotel (via neh.gov)

The National Endowment for the Arts is slated to receive a budget of $146.02 million per the 2014 Omnibus Appropriations bill released by Congress late yesterday. The figure is down from the Obama administration’s proposed $154.47 million and roughly on par with 2013’s allocation of $146.26 million, although that sum dropped to ~$139 million after sequestration. The Omnibus bill is expected to pass Congress this weekend upon the conclusion of a short-term continuing resolution giving Congress additional time to finalize the legislation.

The funding level came as a relief to arts advocacy group Americans for the Arts, which wrote in an email to supporters today that the budget survived a “fractious appropriations process and a government shut-down that lasted 16 days” and “avoided the disastrous proposal” in the House of Representatives to slash NEA funding by 49%.

In a related development, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and a number of other federal cultural organizations will be vacating their current offices at the Old Post Office Pavilion in February 2014. The 114-year-old historic landmark’s new leaseholder, Donald Trump, will be converting it to the Trump International Hotel.

Below are the 2014 Omnibus bill’s major federal allocations to cultural groups alongside the Obama administration’s proposed budget and last year’s appropriation levels:

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  • Jeffrey

    Early arts education takes a beating once again. All in favor of violent sports.

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