Events

ArtRx LA

This week, artists challenge mass media at the Getty Center, the Santa Monica Public Library hosts a participatory performance of a minimalist masterpiece, an artist-conceived pop-up shop in Chinatown offers last-minute holiday goods, and more.

Kelly Akashi: Being as a Thing, installation view (via ghebaly.com)

 Feminist Reading Group

When: Tuesday, December 20, 7:30–9:30pm
Where: Women’s Center for Creative Work (2425 Glover Place, Elysian Valley, Los Angeles)

Originally published in 2004, a new edition of Rebecca Solnit’s Hope in the Dark comes at a time when many of us are especially in need of light. Solnit’s book argues against complacency and despair, advocating instead for radical activism when faced with an uncertain future. The Women’s Center for Creative Work’s Feminist Reading Group will be discussing the book at this week’s meeting, which also features a holiday party and book exchange. Bring a book to gift, and a small snack or beverage to share.

Rebecca Solnit, “Hope in the Dark” (via Facebook)

Breaking News: Turning the Lens on Mass Media

When: Opens Tuesday, December 20
Where: Getty Center (1200 Getty Center Drive, Brentwood, Los Angeles)

Given recent outrage over “fake news” and the accuracy of media sources, the Getty Center’s new exhibition Breaking News couldn’t be more timely. Spanning 50 years from the Vietnam War era to the War on Terror, the show features artists who respond to and challenge the subjectivity of mass-media messages. These include Donald Blumberg’s photographic mosaics of TV news images, Sarah Charlesworth‘s reproductions of newspaper front pages with the text removed, and Omer Fast’s video collage of CNN talking heads, reconfigured to deliver meaningful messages.

Catherine Opie, “Bush Smiling, Help Us,” from the series Close to Home (2005), dye-diffusion prints (courtesy the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles, © Catherine Opie, via getty.edu)

 Ye Olde XXXMas Pop Up Shoppe

When: Wednesday, December 21, 4–7pm
Where: Charlie James Gallery (969 Chung King Road, Chinatown, Los Angeles)

Everything Must Go! Ye Olde XXXMas Pop Up Shoppe (via Facebook)

If you’re behind on your holiday shopping or haven’t even started yet, Charlie James Gallery has you covered. In conjunction with Keith Rocka Knittel’s current solo show, More Los Angeles Poems, the artist is throwing a one-day XXXMas Pop Up Shoppe featuring sculptures, drawings, Spiral Jetty lamps, cat-themed items, and records from Rocka Knittel’s own collection. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Spay Neuter Project of Los Angeles.

 Terry Riley’s “In C”

When: Wednesday, December 21, 7:30–8:30pm
Where: Santa Monica Public Library (601 Santa Monica Blvd, Santa Monica, California)

With a career dating back over five decades, Terry Riley is unequivocally one of the most influential living minimalist composers. Fans will get a chance to participate in one of his earliest compositions, “In C,” this Wednesday when Soundwaves hosts an open performance of this ambient masterpiece. Interested musicians, with pitched instruments only, should download the score and arrive at 6pm for a rehearsal.

Terry Riley, “In C” (via Facebook)

 Sculpt

When: Thursday, December 22, 10pm–2am
Where: Cloak & Dagger (1666 McCadden Place, Hollywood, Los Angeles)

When Loris Greaud’s perplexing film Sculpt premiered at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art last summer, it was seen by only a handful of visitors. This was by design, as each screening was for just one viewer at a time. This Thursday’s event at private club Cloak & Dagger will expose the work to a much larger audience, with multiple screenings throughout the night, as well as a midnight ritual based on a scene from the film. Those interested in attending should fill out the submission form, and will then be entered into a public lottery for tickets. All-black attire required.

Loris Gréaud, “Sculpt” (2016) (via xcloakanddaggerx.com)

 Kelly Akashi: Being as a Thing

When: Closes Friday, December 23
Where: François Ghebaly Gallery (2245 E Washington Boulevard, Downtown, Los Angeles)

One of the most memorable pieces from this year’s Hammer Biennial was Kelly Akashi’s evocative sculpture suspended above the museum’s courtyard. The flesh-toned, cast object resembled a splayed oyster or layered onion, recalling intimate, interior spaces. Her current solo show Being as a Thing, continues her material explorations, with organic sculptures and installations made out of lead, bronze, glass, fiber, and wax. Many of these are formed into candles that slowly melt away as they provide light by which to see the other works.

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