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US Military Kills (Most) Print Magazines, Endorses Internet

by Mostafa Heddaya on August 1, 2013

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Magazines, binned. (image via Flickr user Danny Sullivan)

Military Times is reporting that the American military has discontinued the bulk of its magazine offerings, a cut affecting some 891 publications, among them 17 art and art-related periodicals. The move follows a sudden realization that the Internet is a thing and nearly nobody buys print magazines by the leadership of the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), a network of 3,100 state-run stores servicing servicemen and women worldwide:

“The decision to no longer stock the material is a business decision driven by the time, money and energy required to facilitate buying habits, combined with decreasing demand,” Army Lt. Col. Antwan C. Williams, an AAFES spokesman, said in the story. “Magazine sales are on a sustained downward trajectory due to the proliferation of digital delivery.”

Say it ain’t so, Lt. Col. Antwan C. Williams! Though the Military Times piece makes it seem like this decision was about “adult” publications (headline: “AAFES to stop selling adult magazines amid slumping sales”), they don’t even constitute the majority of the axed publications. The full list contains such cultural heavyweights as Lapham’s Quarterly, Interview, and Yoga Magazine. Here are the impacted art publications:

h/t Mike Nizza

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