Allison Meier

Galleries

Shredded Sheets and a Mountain of Words

by Allison Meier on December 19, 2014

Post image for Shredded Sheets and a Mountain of Words

A mountain of typography and a two-story installation of ripped fabric are on view at Pierogi Gallery’s the Boiler as part of Terra Infirma, a duo exhibition featuring Linda Herritt and Elana Herzog.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Tate Digitizes 52,000 Artifacts from the Lives of British Artists

Around 52,000 letters, sketchbooks, photographs, and other ephemera of 20th-century British artists will be accessible online by next summer. The first 6,000 items were revealed this month as part of the Tate Archive.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Latin American Naturalists Step Out of the Shadows

In Latin American natural history, the achievements of outsiders often eclipse homegrown science and study, but Latino Natural History, a digital exhibition that launched this month, spotlights their contributions.

Continue Reading →

Articles

The Physics of Pollock

by Allison Meier on December 18, 2014

Post image for The Physics of Pollock

The laws of physics were greater collaborators with Jackson Pollock than most painters.

Continue Reading →

Articles

11 Creative Calendars for 2015

by Allison Meier on December 18, 2014

Post image for 11 Creative Calendars for 2015

The year is counting down its final days, and we’ll soon be halfway through the second decade of this century. How will you measure the next 365 days?

Continue Reading →

Books

A History of Art on the Final Frontier

by Allison Meier on December 18, 2014

Post image for A History of Art on the Final Frontier

The first instance of a space discovery affecting art was likely 1608’s Somnium, a novel by astronomer Johannes Kepler about a trip to the moon following a pathway revealed by a demon. Ron Miller includes the curious story in The Art of Space, published this October by Zenith Press, which chronicles the history of artists interpreting the frontier beyond Earth’s atmosphere.

Continue Reading →
Post image for A Lost Purple Pigment, Where Quantum Physics and the Terracotta Warriors Collide

The connection between contemporary quantum physics and China’s ancient Terracotta Warriors is a lost pigment called Han purple. The vibrant hue appeared in the Zhou dynasty and faded out sometime near 220 AD; art didn’t see a purple as vivid until 19th-century manufacturing.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Douglas Gordon Goes Swimming in the Shallow End

In Claude Debussy’s 1910 prelude “La cathédrale engloutie” (“The Sunken Cathedral”), shuddering waves of chords grow and then drown out in tribute to a mythical cathedral rising out of the sea and then disappearing again. In Douglas Gordon’s new “tears become… streams become…” installation at the Park Avenue Armory, the rippling notes are provided each night by pianist Hélène Grimaud, who plays a Steinway encircled by a reflecting pool of 122,000 gallons of water.

Continue Reading →
Post image for Undoing a 19th-Century Art Restorer’s Overzealous Handiwork

The 19th-century art restorer Raffaele Gargiulo was so good at reconstructing Greek vases, one antiquarian called it a “dangerous perfection for knowledge.” Filling in broken gaps with his own paintings, mending cracks with brass staples, his work was a potential threat to history.

Continue Reading →
Post image for A Portrait of the 21st-Century Alps, Where Glaciers Retreat and Concrete Advances

The Alps today are different mountains from when the first 19th-century photographers hoisted heavy plate cameras up their craggy sides. Glaciers are in retreat, ski resorts are firmly lodged into slopes, and human infrastructure crawls back and forth steadily up their inclines.

Continue Reading →