Felix Gonzalez-Torres

Post image for Garry Winogrand and the Perils of Posthumous Prints

A deserved tribute to Garry Winogrand is turning into an ethical morass that does no one any good.

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Post image for Cady Noland and Diane Arbus Make a Picnic Out of You

The current show at Gagosian, Portraits of America: Diane Arbus/Cady Noland is in a small gallery reachable only by walking into and through the Gagosian’s Upper East Side gift shop. In order to see the exhibition, to enter the gallery, one must first pass through this physical barrier.

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Museums

The Redemption of Ron Athey

by Abe Ahn on March 20, 2014

Post image for The Redemption of Ron Athey

LOS ANGELES — Twenty years after performing at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Ron Athey has come a long way from art world pariah to celebrated performance artist.

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Post image for Your Worst Fear and Your Best Fantasy Traced Through Art History

Holding a sign that reads “I am your worst fear, I am your best fantasy,” a photograph of a proud and defiant woman at a gay liberation march in the 1970s opens Phaidon’s newly published Art & Queer Culture, illustrating the dual visions of queer identity by the field of art history.

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Post image for Art Glut and How to Handle It

By Monday, the reality of the mandated reductions in government spending, otherwise known as sequestration, had begun to sink in. For its part, the New York Times announced, to no one’s surprise, “the split between American workers and the companies that employ them is widening and could worsen in the next few months as federal budget cuts take hold.”

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Post image for Photo Preview: “NYC 1993” at the New Museum

Opening tonight, the New Museum’s NYC 1993: Experimental Jet Set, Trash and No Star purports to offer a time capsule, or, as the museum’s curator Gary Carrion-Murayari put it, a “form of collective memory” documenting a particular time in a particular art scene, namely, New York City in the ’90s.

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Post image for Where Do Ai Weiwei’s Sunflower Seeds Begin and End?

BERKELEY, California — At Haines Gallery in San Francisco’s Financial District, I finally got to see Ai Weiwei’s notorious “Kui Hua Zi” (Sunflower Seeds). There has been much hype around Ai Weiwei and this particular installation, and seeing it caught me by surprise. The Haines Gallery installation was smaller than I expected and much calmer than the media surrounding it. Yet as I looked on, the piece and its maker’s history withdrew into the background, while its powerful implications and art historical relevance grew. It is a truly remarkable piece.

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Post image for Baltimore Museum of Art Gets a New Contemporary Wing

If most people think of contemporary Baltimore as the land of John Waters, then maybe the Baltimore Museum of Art’s growing presence on the contemporary art scene may help diversify people’s perceptions beyond the drag queen Divine and campy gay bars. The museum announced details yesterday about their renovation currently in progress on its contemporary wing.

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Post image for Always Here, Always Queer and Art History Is Starting to Get Used To It

While at the landmark exhibition Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture at the Brooklyn Museum, I realized I had to start my review with a statement that will look simple and quite possibly stupid: Hide/Seek is more than David Wojnarowicz’s “A Fire In My Belly.”

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Post image for Making Sense of Trauma Through Art

To commemorate the 10th anniversary, MoMA PS1 organized a group exhibition, titled September 11, now on view to January 9, 2012. Curator Peter Eleey has brought together more than 70 works by 41 artists — many made prior to 9/11 — to investigate the attacks’ enduring resonance.

Avoiding sensational images of the attack, as well as art made directly in response, the exhibition offers an entry point by which to contemplate the tragic event and its after effects and to look at the ways it has changed how we see and experience the world in its wake.

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