BGCG

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Barbara Nessim: An Artful Life is the first US retrospective of a pioneering artist, professional illustrator, and early user of the computer as an artistic tool. Three floors of the BGC’s townhouse gallery feature Nessim’s artworks — from her meticulous sketchbooks, to illustrations, paintings, collages, and rare examples of fashion design.

Visualizing 19th-Century New York explores New York City through prints and photographs produced by its cultural entrepreneurs. Using the latest technology available, men such as Mathew Brady (daguerreotypes), Edward and Henry T. Anthony (stereoviews), Currier & Ives (lithographs), and Harper & Brothers (woodcuts in popular magazines and books) created a vast commercial market for their images of the booming metropolis.

Both exhibitions continue through January 11, 2015. The BGC Gallery is located at 18 West 86th Street (Upper West Side, Manhattan). For information visit bgc.bard.edu/gallery.

Upcoming Lectures:

Panic in the Parlor: Reporting and Reading Pictorial Newspapers in Gilded Age America
Thursday, October 30, 2014, 6 pm 
Illustrated newspapers such as Harper’s Weekly  were among the most prominent items to be found in the nineteenth-century American family parlor. Joshua Brown examines the weekly publications which brought the era’s rampant political corruption, economic chaos, and roiling social turmoil right into the homes of Gilded Age Americans. Read more.

Image as Language: On Being an Art Director
Thursday, November 6, 2014, 6 pm
Art director Ruth Ansel presents highlights from her five-decade career working with international artists and photographers including Richard Avedon, Diane Arbus, Helmut Newton, Andy Warhol, Bruce Weber, Annie Leibovitz, and David Hockney. Read more.

Images from top of post: (Left )Barbara Nessim at the School of Visual Arts,1986, photographed by Seiji Kakizaki. Courtesy of the artist. (Right) Chatham Square, New York, 1853-55. Daguerreotype. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gilman Collection, Gift of The Howard Gilman Foundation, 2005.

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